A Celebratory Week to Remember

Well it was a fun, celebratory week to remember — one for the recollection record books!

Easter Sunday started it off — after a month of prep with finally getting a new garage roof completed. We still have some refinement to do so I’ll have to post a picture later. My Clivia plant, also known as a Kaffir Lily, seemed to be waiting to bloom on this special occasion. How appropriate and really beautiful this African plant is. My father-in-law gave it to me with multiple “babies” as offshoots that I divided and gave to my sister and sons. I’m waiting to hear if theirs’ bloomed.

Kaffir Lily blooms on Art Is Everywhere

Other plants that are flourishing are on our roof. The two types of butter/bib and arugula lettuce are three times the size of this now and nearly ready to harvest. Snap beans, beets and cauliflower seeds are coming along. I’ll need to replant the carrots though.

Rooftop Garden GlowPear Containers on AIE

You can read more about these hydroponic GlowPear planters on Houzz, where we purchased a second one.

My husband was able to get tickets through his office to the National Museum of African American History & Culture (NMAAHC), which is near impossible since they are sold out already through July. There was a special viewing between 8 – 10 am midweek and I took my friend Liza. Although we needed Peter with us to enter, he decided not to attend in order for us to be able to when security discovered my miniature pairing knife in my purse that I had forgotten all about. Ugh!! They wouldn’t let me leave it with them so Peter took it back to his car and missed the museum opportunity but he’ll get more tickets. He also had a meeting that was going to shorten his time anyway and you really need a full day, as we discovered, to take it all in. We didn’t return home until 4:30. It took over 7 hours to go through at a leisurely pace, which you need to do to be able to read and process all the info. Fortunately, I had cleared my work calendar in advance. There is a tremendous amount to cover and the museum does a good job of showing viewers the progression of the African American history through three sub-terrain, what I call the “oppressive” concourses that move through the start of Slavery to Freedom > Defending Freedom and Segregation > Changing America 1968 & Beyond. Although there is still a sense of uncertainty at the end of the exhibit, one leaves with a positive appreciation of the African American history and all its accomplishments as well as the strength of the American Spirit.

The African American experience is the lens through which we understand what it is to be an American. — Lonnie Bunch (Founding Director)

NMAAHC museum building on AIE

NMAAHC museum

The first sense one has upon entering the museum is from the exterior grill work that suppresses the light, yet fills the space with ornamentation. It is supposed to recall the grill work in New Orleans that was made by slave labor and you do get a sense, especially in the lower galleries, of being in a cargo hold of a slave ship with only one way up and out.

NMAAHC grill work on Art Is Everywhere

You start at the bottom and walk through each concourse and move onto the next via ramps. There are no elevators or restrooms on any of these floors. If the intent was to be somewhat uncomfortable, then it works. There are, however, plenty of places to sit and rest, watch a movie, reflect or just take a break. I had to use the restroom and needed to walk all the way up while Liza rested. There was a placard at the top warning that once you exited you could not re-enter. I had to flag someone down to ask them if I could come back in. Although it wasn’t a problem, I can’t imagine the planners didn’t think this common occurrence through. It must happen a lot. There were hoards of people in line a this point and we were only half way through the exhibit. I hustled back to get a move on before it became crowded. It was starting to on the third concourse, especially when we visited the Emmett Till Memorial, where no pictures were allowed. This was a horrible event about a 14 year old African American boy who was lynched simply because some “white” folk were looking to make examples of blacks. The outcome is what sparked insurgence, uprising and riots, along with the tragic death of Martin Luther King. However, the final part of the main exhibit shows the progression of the African Americans to assimilate within the middle class, become major TV and music celebrities. In fact, America has a lot to be thankful for with their cultural contribution.

Colonial Slavery figures on Art Is Everywhere

Prominent Colonial historical figures including Thomas Jefferson and Mum Bet, who sued the State of Massachusetts to win her freedom and consequently abolished slavery in MA

Ashley's Sack 1 NMAAHC on AIE

This story is pretty heartbreaking. There were many that were but this one spoke to me.

Ashley's Sack 2 NMAAHC on AIE

It was interesting to note that at the very start of the Slave Trade, which was sparked by the sugar trade, Creole Africans were wealthy diplomats and highly sought after for their language capabilities and cultural knowledge.

Concourse 3 - 2 NMAAHC on AIE

Moving from Concourse 3 to 2

slave and free houses at NMAAHC on Art Is Everywhere

Juxtaposition between Slave House on lower Concourse 3 and Freed Slave’s own home on upper Concourse 2

Stereotypes at NMAAHC on AIE

Stereotypes in toys and paraphenalia

Segregated clinic hours at NMAAHC on AIE

These segregated clinic hours are hard to believe in this current time

Maple Leaf Rag on AIE

My parents used to dance to the Maple Leaf Rag

Angola guard station_interactive bar at NMAAHC on AIE

Angola Prison Guard Station and the Interactive “Segregation Bar” where you can follow a movement as if you’re a member

Soul Train on Art Is Everywhere

1968 & Beyond brings up Soul Train, which was big part of my childhood

Assimilating into Middle America on Art Is Everywhere

Assimilating into Middle America

Another Rat Pack Digs on Art Is Everywhere

The other Rat Pack Digs in Chicago

Foxy Brown and Sly and Family Stone on AIE

Foxy Brown movies still play on TV and notice Sly & Family Stone written on his piano keys

Main NMAAHC exhibit end on AIE

Main exhibit ends with highlights from the 2000’s like Hurricane Katrina and the Obama Administration, how could we forget.

We decided to break for lunch. The food at the Sweet Home Cafe was excellent! You could choose which regional fare you wanted to try. Of course I went right for the Creole Southern Duck / Andouille Sausage Gumbo but then changed my mind at the last-minute to get the Shrimp and Grits because the shrimp were gigantic! The meal was delicious and a generous portion! The dining hall was in the shape of the “ark” or museum Congo ship, yet each layer had vines growing in the indented, internal troughs. The back walls were mirrored to make the space look twice as large as what we thought it could hold. We didn’t wait around for that test because the buses of people were now streaming in.

Panoramic Mall view from the top of NMAAHC on AIE

Panoramic Mall view from the top

Looking down on the Gift Shop on AIE

Looking down on the Gift Shop

Reproductions of Mary Jackson's baskets in the gift shop on AIE

Reproductions of Mary Jackson’s baskets in the gift shop

After a much needed energy refresh, we tackled the top four floors. Similarly to the sub-floors, where you start at the bottom and walk up, we started in reverse at the very top and moved downward. We visited all the floors but only experienced three. There were elevators and escalators and restrooms on all of these. The top floor Culture Galleries was my favorite. It showed the importance of the African American culture in food, music, arts, fashion, and sports. I by-passed the last, but fully savored all the others. I was just as impressed with the exhibition layout as I was with the rich content. The first oval room had double display bays with the interior, bench-seating to the double-sided, wall-alcoves with a musical entertainment-video that changed visuals with the continuous music that wrapped around the top of the room. We moved from here to the Visual Art Gallery with primarily contemporary art (not my thing) to the Musical Achievement wing with Chuck Berry’s car greeting us at the entry. I breezed through the Theatre section and will have to go back.

Food & Culture greet you on the top 4th floor of NMAAHC on AIE

Food & Culture greet you on the top 4th floor. Chef Leah Chase is prominently featured with her Dooky Chase restaurant in New Orleans.

Earth Wind & Fire at NMAAHC on AIE

Earth Wind & Fire is one of my favorite bands highlighted in the Musical component

Allen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz sectionAllen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz section on AIE

Allen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz section

Level 3 housed the Community Galleries, where some of the main exhibit details were further explored. For instance, there was an entire room dedicated to Muhammad Ali, another section to Ben Carson, and another to the Military Experience. Maybe I missed it, but I didn’t see any recognition given to Clarence Thomas but did see Thurgood Marshal and Anita Hill mentioned in regard to the Supreme Court. There were also mini exhibits dedicated to Making a Way Out of No Way with progress in medical, religion and school, etc., highlighted.

We didn’t have enough energy to explore the Explore More Gallery on the 2nd level, which was mainly interactive exhibits. I popped my head in and saw one older white woman, who was the only one dancing to an instructional video by an African American dance troupe. Others were watching and encouraging her as if she was playing “Wei” by herself but doing a pretty good job.

We took an Uber home and had an interesting discussion with our American-Cuban driver, Marisol about the experience. Funny, we missed Oprah by one day, as she was there the next day to screen the Henrietta Lacks movie airing on HBO. I read the book several years ago and am interested to see the movie. It’s definitely a story that needs more exposure.

Earlier in the week, Peter and I celebrated our wedding anniversary by finally visiting the Trump Hotel to see how the Old Post Office was revamped. We had drinks in the main lobby, which is huge but well decorated. The main architecture and iron struts of the original building remained and painted gold. I liked the peacock, teal blue and green velvet seating paired with amber and gold throughout the expansive room. The bar wall was mirrored to the top and filled with clear glass decanters and glasses situated on dark mahogany shelving. Very impressive. Two large TV’s were playing Fox News. We were seated next to what had to be a bevy of beautiful friends of The Real Housewives of DC. No kidding. This was entertaining to say the least.

Trump International Hotel anniversary for drinks on AIE

Trump International Hotel anniversary for drinks. The ladies had left by this point.

Trump Hotel Bar area on Art Is Everywhere

Although the ambience was captivating, the service was off. We had to call someone over after 15 minutes. They gave us water and nuts without napkins and the hostess took our initial order. The place was nearly filled but not that busy. We sampled the signature cocktails, which were unfortunately too expensive at $25 – $29 and actually did not taste very good, which is too bad! We stuck with wine and cheese choices which were good and surprisingly affordable. All in all, it was a different way to celebrate an off-year; even though, there can be some improvements made, especially if you’re expecting the best.

Trump DC Hotel at night on AIE

Trump DC Hotel at night

Meanwhile, the rest of the week was enjoying the gorgeous spring weather. Even the cats seemed to relish this indoors and out.

Cats sleeping on AIE

This picture cracks me up. These cats sleep so differently.

Cats outside on AIE

Ingrid enjoys outside on AIE

Ingrid just turned 1 year old

Save

Save

Save

Save

Butterflies Everywhere

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you’ll know that I like butterflies. Well, I’m finding butterflies everywhere these days. How appropriately so because of the upcoming transformative celebration of Easter this Sunday.

We host our annual brunch for about 50 folks, so this post will consequently be short. 😉

This is my recent butterfly find from Elle Decor, as they tend to be circling back in style. (Personally, I never thought they flitted out of style.)

Butterflies everywhere in style via Elle Decor on Art Is Everywhere

Butterflies in style via Elle Decor

You can find recent and previous butterfly references here.

Also, here are a few updates and worthy mentions:

 

  1. The Fearless Girl Statue will stay in place for at least a year — until February 2018. Let’s hope everyone gets so used to it that it becomes permanent.

2. If you haven’t read the book Hillbilly Elegy – A Memoir of Family & Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance, it is a worthwhile read with real enjoyment. It’s both eye-opening and exceptionally told (orated by the author) from the insider’s perspective that helps explain a large portion of America’s people and their upbringing while being one of the few to “make it” and find the American Dream. (Even Oprah read this book, or is at least shown in a photo with the book on her table.)

Although the memoir was specific to Vance, it was embraced as a personification of the everyday struggles of America’s white underclass, and it shone a light on issues including race and privilege in America.Deadline Hollywood.

This just learned — the book will become a movie.

Click this link to listen to a sample. It personally moved me with my father’s Kentucky roots and even some real life characters being similar in name. For instance, J. D.’s name and his sister’s are similar names to my brother, John D (named after my father) and my sister Lindsey. Even his first home town in Jackson, KY, is all too uncanny to me. Although he currently lives in San Francisco, is a venture capitalist, works with Steve Case, he has DC Gibson Dunn law connections. There were unexpected guffaw moments of hilarious laughter and equal shocks of sadness but if everyone read this, there could be signs of hope, which is a good thing for this time of year — and a perfect thing on which to end this post.

Happy Easter!

Save

Save

The Fearless Girl

Last Wednesday a week ago, many women abandoned their work and marched to recognize “A Day Without A Woman” but I found the Fearless Girl statue facing down the well-known “raging” Wall Street Bull sculpture much more remarkable and leaving a powerful impression. Ironically the US-based political march was mostly by angry women striking about a life without women with participants shouting visceral chants against the newest administration. I’m for free speech but I think the Fearless Girl, precisely as little as she is, has more impact.

The march was strategically planned on International Women’s Day, which has a long history (since 1911) of celebrating the positive accomplishments of women. It brings recognition to the importance of women, since the oppression of women was first recognized in 1908 — with a march. The recent women’s strike was not mentioned on the IWD’s website.

This is not to say marches don’t send a message. They can and have affected change. I’m in Northern VA, where schools had to close because female teachers didn’t come to work. The Fearless Girl statue, however, gives an enduring visual perspective through the personal expression of art that a fleeting march just can’t. The statue brought all sorts of questions to mind because I didn’t know its backstory but wondered who the artist was and how the statue was able to be placed in the current location. Will it stay?

Here’s what I learned. The statue was commissioned and officially put in location by State Street Global Advisors and they tweeted this statementWe wanted to highlight the power of women in leadership. So we made room in the one place business couldn’t ignore.

Fearless Girl video by State Street Advisors via Youtube on AIE

Fearless Girl video by State Street Advisors via YouTube. Click this link to play.

This is a wonderful video! I love the demonstration of the creative process and the message. Hey, but where’s the credit to the artist, who is female, by the way?!!

Here’s how they installed — the day before the women’s march and IWD.

And the message at this little super power of a statue’s feet says much.

Fearless girl statue base via CNN on AIE

The Fearless Girl faces the Charging Wall Street Bull.

Fearless girl statue back via wbur_AIE

via WBUR

Fearless girl statue front via CNN_AIE

She really does look like a super heroine, with her stance and standing strong in the wind, visible by the flow of her dress and movement of her hair. I hope she stays in place. Based on some of the comments on Twitter, sadly, it looks like this is a temporary installation. There is a petition going around to keep her in place, however.

Also, at the time of this writing, I could not find a single mention of credit (via State Street or the McCannNY Ad Agency, who is running their campaign) given to the female artist who created the statue and who is shown in the video. I asked about it on YouTube because overlooking this significant information seems contrary to the message the statue is being used by the ad agency to give — females make a difference (girl power and #shemakesadifference) — and should be noted as such, as should all artists.

Finally, I found the artist mentioned on KTLA 5 news, where I found the picture below. Her name is Kristen Visbal, and here’s her wonderful work!

My favorite picture thus far is how this beautifully rendered statue has already inspired little girls to be the super heros they are.

Abrianna Tabor Almonte wears her red-and-pink superhero outfit to go see the “Fearless Girl” statue on Wall Street. (Credit: Amanda Marmor via CNN)_AIE

Abrianna Tabor Almonte wears her red-and-pink superhero outfit to go see the “Fearless Girl” statue on Wall Street. (Credit: Amanda Marmor via CNN)

Post this publication, here’s a reader’s comment in the Washington Post remarking on the same, non-mention of the artist.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Under One Symbolic Restored Dome

Today is Thanksgiving.

We have a lot to be thankful for and to look forward to with a new start.

However, with such a divided country, it is hopeful to see the US Capital Dome newly restored. With the unveiling of the newly restored Capitol Dome,The Architect of the Capitol has revealed a renewed emblem of national unity.

Restored Capitol Dome_AIE

via Washington Post

Let’s remember what this Nation was built on, America’s unity and try to be grateful and move forward with America’s continued prosperity in mind, “one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”.

Click here to read more about the history of our Nation’s Capitol Dome, see 44 pictures and a video about the restoration.

Hope you and your family have a happy Thanksgiving!

 

Save

Artistic Tradition Woven in Time and Odyssey

A quick post this week featuring the famed Venetian house of Bevilacqua textiles and their artistic tradition woven in time along with some pictures from New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA’s) 50th Odyssey Ball.

A magical setting from the 50th Odyssey Ball at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Some artwork featured Venetian Masters.

odyssey-ball-highlights on Art Is Everywhere

Odyssey Ball photos by Lorre Lei Jackson

desserts-at-odyssey-ball on Art Is Everywhere

A range of delectable desserts

Timothee Lovelock, the DJviolinist on Art Is Everywhere

Timothee Lovelock, the DJviolinist was one of the featured musicians. I like his violin!

Save

Getting Your Southern Fare Fix

Before vacationing in Ocracoke, North Carolina, we tried out the new Hen Quarter restaurant, in Alexandria. It took over the old Austin Grill but is managed by the same owners with this new Southern cuisine concept. It’s a way to get your Southern fare fix, complete with porkbelly pops, down-home collard greens, fried chicken and some of the best fritter waffles you’ll ever taste and a very smooth-balanced mint julep. Now that’s something coming from a native New Orleanian and still one at heart!

Love their décor and their Southern phrases and charm:

“You’re like the butter to our biscuits…

…and whiskey that warms the heart”

and wouldn’t be the South without the, “Bless your heart” sign hanging.

fried chicken and biscuits_hen quarter_AIE

Classic Southern Biscuits and Fried Chicken

Belly pops prep_Hen Quarter_AIE

How they make their Belly Pops

Belly Pops as appetizers_hen quarter_AIE

Pop ’em in – porkbelly pops melt in your mouth

Here’s the play-by-play video with some good Southern, bluesy music too!

Egg Basket lighting_hen quarter_AIE

Egg Basket lighting that I’ll have to make someday. Love this idea!

Hen Quarter upstairs decor_AIE

Hen Quarter upstairs décor with wood plank walls that kinda remind me of….

Hole in the wall entrance at Captain Gregorys on AIE

You guessed it. It’s a hole in the wall entrance. The flag is the “doorbell”

Now we’re back to thinking of  mint juleps and….

Bourbon flight_hen quarter_AIE

Bourbon flight but where’s the Pappy?

“Free Range Cocktails” (Hen Quarter’s slogan)

…but looking forward now to some much-needed relaxing days while waiting for the green flash at sunset. We haven’t seen it yet but keep hoping!

Pre sunset porch time_AIE

Pre sunset porch time

Sailboat view from dock on AIE

Sailboat view from dock

End of day starting on AIE

Sun Rays – End of day starting

Picture perfect sunset and kayaker in silhouette on AIE

Picture perfect sunset and kayaker in silhouette in Pamlico Sound

Ahhh, summer and cicadas, don’t want it to end…

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

A Mural with Timely Connection

There’s a lot going on in the world and it’s often uncanny to me when I find artwork that has a timely connection to separate but jointly pivotal events.

This 5-story, kaleidoscope-style mural of Bob Dylan located on the side of the Hennepin Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota is by Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra.

Bob Dylan Mural Hennepin Theatre by Eduardo Kobra_AIE

via Hennepin Theatre. Photo credit Bill Hickey

The “times, they are a-changing” quote is not only attributed to and made famous by Bob Dylan but it signifies to me the current upheaval in the word and the political climate we are currently in, but also the possibility for hope that things will change. We cannot continue on this present course.This especially comes to light during recent and shocking terrorists attacks in France again and elsewhere along with racial division here among the very law enforcement who are supposed to protect us and also against them. This is all taking place during the Republican and Democratic conventions, while knowing how much is at stake for the US during this election.

Lincoln Mural_Eduardo Kobra_AIE

Abraham Lincoln mural credit Eduardo Kobra

At the same time, the Olympics are about to start in Brazil. The world is supposed to come together here but there is much unease, unrest, uncertainty and even unethical gaming-the-system with Russian athletes doping in the past to win. At this writing, the Olympic committee may ban them from attending.

What and who do we trust?

Coincidentally, Kobra has also painted one of the largest murals for the Olympics and it’s entitled We Are All One, how timely…

We Are All One Mural by Kobra for the Rio Olympics_AIE

We Are All One Mural by Kobra for the Rio Olympics via Paste

Trust is the foundation for most every relationship, be it business, personal, political or for pleasure. There’s a lot at stake here at home and globally with no real, clear certainty.

As the days lead up to the Games and the Presidential Election gets closer, I hope it will become clearer that the best measures and actions will be taken for safety, security, and trust that our nation and the world can move forward while making sure the “the times are changing” — because they have to. There is no other choice but for peace and prosperity.

For further reading: previous posts on Eduardo Kobra and the Olympic Games and Brazil.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Belgium Solidarity

Joyfully it is Easter Week — a time to celebrate!

In the spirit of energy and renewal, this is quick post as we get ready for our annual Easter Brunch, to show solidarity with the Belgium people. The world has come together, yet again, to express their sympathy and support after the latest terrorists attacks.

It is a sad coincidence that as I wrote my blog post last week, the remaining terrorist in the Paris attacks had been caught in Belgium. I noted that I hoped this victory would give the French and other nations information to prevent future attacks. Tragically in just a week’s time, in between the writing of the last post and this, another horrific terrorist crime has occurred. More innocent people are dead and countries, particularly Europe is on high alert. In the midst of this wake, I’m more encouraged by the unification around the world expressing solidarity with Belgium and efforts to fight terrorism.

Begium Muslims unite on Art Is Everywhere

via Washington Post

This image spoke a message about the human spirit — free and defiant, not afraid to gather, called into action, paying respects to the lives of the dead, offering hopes and prayers for their families and the future.

Thinking about the book Big Magic’s concept that the idea is powerful and can be realized by those who think and act upon it, collectively as more people embrace prayer and thoughts for hope, I believe we can win this war.

Hermes-Butterfly as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Human + Butterfly merge

The butterflies are symbolic for God’s miracles, transformation, and rebirth. They indicate for me that peace will come.

Butterflies are free and in some ways represent transcendence from constraints and this world. Hopefully you’ll see why I like butterflies.

Preventing Cancer with French Flair

My husband and I were excited to be invited as guests to attend the annual Prevent Cancer Gala, held at the National Building Museum. Peter’s Committee Chairman, Congressman Fred Upton and colleague Diana DeGette were the honorees for their tireless efforts to introduce and push legislation through Congress to help find, fund and speed the process for 21st Century Cures for today’s illnesses.

Prevent Cancer Gala-2 honorees_Art Is Everywhere

Prevent Gala honoree_Art Is Everywhere

Organization President and Founder and event Chair, Carolyn Aldigé, Congressman Fred Upton and wife Amey

The theme was La Vie En Rose, which was fitting in light of the Paris terrorist attacks that linger in our collective consciousness. In fact, as I write this post, the remaining terrorist has just been caught in his hometown in Brussels. I hope the French get the information they need and that will help protect other countries from terrorist activities.

Prevent Cancer Gala La Vie En Rose_Art Is EverywhereBizzBash rates the gala as one of Washington’s top events in 2014. It was definitely decorated to the nines, complete with a huge Eiffel Tower replica at the bar with bartenders in berets serving French 75 champagne cocktails. Other French flair attributes included: cabaret dancers, antiqued-mirrored rectangular tables, beautiful floral bouquets of spring flowers in tall vases and individually set en masse down the center of the table. The food was delicious and typically French: bouillabaisse with mussels (my favorite) in a saffron aioli, charred beef tenderloin in red wine jus and cauliflower puree, poirier (pear) au chocolat (chocolate sponge cake with Poire William ice cream) and a demitasse café or tea with macaroons, cappuncino eclairs and almond madeleines. Surprisingly, this was not all that filing.

PreventCancerGala-AIE

Photo by Alfredo Flores. 22nd Annual Prevent Cancer Spring Gala?. National Building Museum. March 11, 2016_AIE

Photo by Alfredo Flores. 22nd Annual Prevent Cancer Spring Gala. National Building Museum. March 11, 2016

French 75 via Gin Foundry_Art Is Everywhere

French 75 via Gin Foundry

I wish I had taken pictures but unfortunately I got so caught up in having a good time that it was not on my radar, except for the first floor shot above. We dress up so infrequently in ballroom attire — long dress and tux — that it would have been nice to document. Dommage! Tant pis, pour les temps prochain!

Prevent Cancer Cabaret Dancers_ArtIsEverywhereYou can see many more pictures on the Prevent Cancer Organization’s Facebook page, but here are a few highlights and with some of the fun folks we met, like the Energy & Commerce Committee’s young staff.

Prevent Cancer Gala attendees_Art Is Everywhere ECC young staff strike a pose_Art Is EverywhereThe French Ambassador spoke. Andrea Roane, our local news anchor was the MC and the most clever method was used for their fundraising. Upon arriving, guests registered their cell phone and credit card with a bevy of young staffers inputting all this info on laptop computers. Guests were then sent a link on their phones to download the Prevent Cancer Org app. There was a floor auction in the bar area that could also be bid online and during the meal. This raised 1 million dollars! Another $40,000 in cash donations was raised during the evening from guests giving any increment using the app and their name would be displayed on the large teleprompters that were conveniently located on either side of the room. These really helped everyone see and hear the speakers as well as stay informed about the fundraising, which cleverly became a competition with those who gave not only pressing others to donate with their names flashing for all to see but anyone who contributed was handed a flashing necklace. You wouldn’t want to be caught without one. Smart!!

Prevent Cancer Gala table arrangements_Art Is Everywhere

Table arrangement. Photo by Josh Hartman

The most impressive thing, however, remains what this organization does with all the dollars it receives.

Prevent Cancer Gala-3_Art Is Everywhere Prevent Cancer Gala-4_Art Is EverywhereThis is a quick update. “Who” knew Roger Daltrey of The Who fame, would be involved in the 21st Century Cures regarding his effort with childhood cancers through Teen Cancer America, the organization he founded with Pete Townsand. This can be viewed via the Energy and Commerce Committee hearing just yesterday.

Roger Daltrey testifies on hill_Art Is Everywhere

The Art of Speaking

I was posting on the Slipcovers for Your Walls blog for Casart coverings about Apple’s latest run in with the FBI about providing a backdoor entry on their devices in relation to their existing home technology, when I came a several great videos on Fast Company.

You could say these videos below explain how there is an art to the well-crafted interview, so the interview questions are perceived the way that one wants the interviewee to hear.

Art of Speaking_interviewing_FastCompany_on Art Is EverywhereOtherwise, the interview becomes a classic case of you say this but this is what they hear.

Actually there’s an art to speaking in general, so keep watching the second video. It humorously shows the double speak within office meetings.

Too funny and too true! (from Fast Company)

If you want to see more, head on over to the Slipcovers for Your Walls blog post on Apple Wants to Unlock Your Door.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...