Butterflies Everywhere

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you’ll know that I like butterflies. Well, I’m finding butterflies everywhere these days. How appropriately so because of the upcoming transformative celebration of Easter this Sunday.

We host our annual brunch for about 50 folks, so this post will consequently be short. 😉

This is my recent butterfly find from Elle Decor, as they tend to be circling back in style. (Personally, I never thought they flitted out of style.)

Butterflies everywhere in style via Elle Decor on Art Is Everywhere

Butterflies in style via Elle Decor

You can find recent and previous butterfly references here.

Also, here are a few updates and worthy mentions:

 

  1. The Fearless Girl Statue will stay in place for at least a year — until February 2018. Let’s hope everyone gets so used to it that it becomes permanent.

2. If you haven’t read the book Hillbilly Elegy – A Memoir of Family & Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance, it is a worthwhile read with real enjoyment. It’s both eye-opening and exceptionally told (orated by the author) from the insider’s perspective that helps explain a large portion of America’s people and their upbringing while being one of the few to “make it” and find the American Dream. (Even Oprah read this book, or is at least shown in a photo with the book on her table.)

Although the memoir was specific to Vance, it was embraced as a personification of the everyday struggles of America’s white underclass, and it shone a light on issues including race and privilege in America.Deadline Hollywood.

This just learned — the book will become a movie.

Click this link to listen to a sample. It personally moved me with my father’s Kentucky roots and even some real life characters being similar in name. For instance, J. D.’s name and his sister’s are similar names to my brother, John D (named after my father) and my sister Lindsey. Even his first home town in Jackson, KY, is all too uncanny to me. Although he currently lives in San Francisco, is a venture capitalist, works with Steve Case, he has DC Gibson Dunn law connections. There were unexpected guffaw moments of hilarious laughter and equal shocks of sadness but if everyone read this, there could be signs of hope, which is a good thing for this time of year — and a perfect thing on which to end this post.

Happy Easter!

Save

Save

Post Mardi Gras Mention

Another Mardi Gras has gone by but not without making a post Mardi Gras mention about several events happening recently.

First, with tribute to a Southern cuisine-mix and Mardi Gras, about which I’ve just hosted 2 fun dinners for friends. The first being for my Book Group two Tuesdays ago after my birthday weekend. To “prepare” 😉 Peter and I experienced the new Honeysuckle restaurant by Chef Hamilton Johnson because he features the unusual pairing of Nordic and Southern cuisine, and does it exceptionally well.

Honeysuckle-logo-food_AIE

The restaurant is in the former location of Vidalia a long-time DC classic. It’s chef was Chef Johnson’s mentor, so stands to reason he would follow suit, but in his own way. You still have to go downstairs to get to the restaurant but from the outside, you’re not sure it’s the restaurant or so upscale with graffiti-style murals of skulls and bones by Rick Bach on a bold red backdrop. The simple Honeysuckle name is on the outside black canopy entrance. The name doesn’t seem to jive with the theme. However, if you think about it, honeysuckle is one of the sweetest-smelling and hardiest flowering-vines in the South — one of my favorites. Honeysuckle also grows in Finland and is the main ingredient of one of their famous teas. In this case, the complexity of the sweet and flowery balances the hard-edge juxtaposition with the food and décor, maybe also just like the chef with his many tattoos. Chef Johnson is a master of combining complete opposites with creative, cooking artistry.

Chef Hamilton Johnson profile_AIE

This photo greets you at the bottom of the stairs

Honeysuckle2 interior_AIE

The restaurant interior is a mix of more murals on the ceiling, a vermilion colored back-lit bar with rotating images of Finland on a large TV screen. Dining areas and rooms are separated by themed rock stars with their large-scale portraits commanding a presence as some of Chef Johnson’s favorite performers. We ate in the Freddie Mercury elevated area. It was a gorgeous setting with shimmery white-capiz wallcovering that I recognized from Maya Romanoff. Mercury was wearing a bunch of bananas as a headdress, which seemed to downplay the elegance in a self-deprecating and appreciative way. Freddie Mercury Room Honeysuckle_AIE

I had mentioned to our waiter that it was my birthday and part of the reason for attending was to experience the unusual Nordic / Southern pairing. Being from New Orleans and that I’ll be going on a Scandinavian cruise to visit my Danish heritage, experiencing the combination was something I could appreciate. I’m not sure if this is how we received a complementary order of sweet breads from the chef. It’s not something I would have ordered but was the most delicious thing!

Honeysuckle_sweetbreads_AIE

The winter vegetable salad of pistachio, prune, meyer lemon, buttermilk, tarragon, buckwheat on butter lettuce served on top of the Icelandic dressing was something I semi-replicated for my book group dinner, with the addition of Southern grapefruit, mandarin orange segments, walnuts and cranberried goat cheese crumbles. It was delicious and I’ll do it again and again. (Good tip: put the dressing on the bottom to prepare in advance without wilting the lettuce)

Book Group Dinner version of Scandinavian_Southern style_AIE

My Book Group Dinner version of Scandinavian + Southern style – Mardi Gras colored flowers with Fleur-de-lis Iris & dragonflies connected to Norse goddes Freya

Scandanavian-Southern-salad_AIE

Winter Beet Salad version

Peter had the fois gras to start and the slow roasted Icelandic cod, rutabaga, chicken crackling, smoked roe, malted veloute. The seared sea scallops, pig tail tortellini, squash fondue, coffee-bacon jam, parmesan was initially calling my name but the waiter talked me into their pork special, which I am not sure is currently the same on their menu as the dulse rubbed pork tenderloin, cipollini, melted parsnip, roasted apple, kale, as mine had Icelandic dried seaweed. I won out with mine, which was rich and abundant. We finished by sharing the butterscotch panna cotta, oats, skyr creme fraiche, rum raisin, toffee meringue dessert, which was soft, light and divine! This is one restaurant where we will be returning, especially as the menu changes and our waiter informed us intends on being even more daring with the Nordic-Southern pairings.

Honeysuckle_cod2_AIE

Icelandic Cod

Honeysuckle Pannacotta_AIE

Luscious panna cotta for dessert

Then second Mardi Gras mention was a combination of this Southern theme with Nordic style to pay tribute to the book we read, God’s Daughter, Vikings of the New World Saga Book 1 by Heather Day Gilbert. Since I didn’t take pictures during my book group dinner, I replicated afterwards (see some above as well as below). I will be making some of the same dishes on Mardi Gras evening to celebrate our good friend, Steve’s birthday. Most years his birthday falls on Ash Wednesday or during Lent and he can never fully celebrate while giving up all drinking and sweets during this time. We thought the timing worth acknowledging with a dinner for the many times we’ve been treated.

Scandinavian Style_Creole Seafood Gumbo_AIE

Scandinavian Style + Creole Seafood Gumbo

2 Types of King Cake - traditional & Danish_AIE

2 Types of King Cake – traditional & Danish

Instead of the Nordic theme, this second dinner was full on New Orleans. However, unlike the typical seafood gumbo, like I did for the ladies, or with chicken and andouille sausage, this gumbo was made with scallops (Steve’s favorite and happens to be mine as well) from Peter’s New York Times recipes. Scallops are more New England than they are southern but this was a nice twist on a classic New Orleans recipe. Mark Bittman does a great job of simply making this recipe work. I also replicated the Southern beet salad.

Scallop Gumbo_Art Is Everywhere

Scallop Gumbo. This was delicious and maybe even better than the previous.

We had our 4th King Cake of the season from Best Buns. It is scrumptious with an almond base, traditional frosting and colored sprinkles and unlike others, not dry at all. Getting one from Calludah’s, which is where I would have ordered would have cost over 4 times as much, so not worth it when this is local and extremely good.

I was going to make a six layer doberge cake but realizing the work, we had scouted a local one at Del Frisco’s for my birthday and it was well worth the venture. However, we found a small chocolate one for Steve instead. Although 3 layers, it is just the right size from Wegman’s, which is where we’ve started doing most of our shopping with savings.

Del Friscos Lemon Doberge_AIE

Del Friscos Lemon Doberge Cake

personal chocolate cake_AIE

Personal Chocolate Cake

Birthday wishes_AIE

Making Birthday Wishes

Now that we’re starting the Lenten season, it’s nice to reflect back on the Mardi Gras abundance this year with many reasons to celebrate — with our own creative takes on ways to enjoy.

Picture perfect birthday day_AIE

Picture perfect birthday day

I’ll end with a pretty perfect pairing of Mardi Gras transitioning to the reflective time of Lent, sacrifice and service for others. Cleland Powell III, who is the vice president of Iberia Bank in New Orleans, was chosen as the artist for the annual 2017 Rex Proclamation (King of Carnival poster, which calls for all to participate in Mardi Gras). He is a self-taught painter and was selected for his talent. Normally, the artist would be paid 10 percent of poster sales for such an honor. According to The New Orleans Advocate, Powell is donating his profits to the Pro Bono Publico Foundation, the Rex foundation that benefits the city, especially its public schools. The article also mentions, his work is in good company. Previous proclamation artists include Dawn DeDeaux, Mignon Faget, Randolph Tucker Fitz-Hugh, Tony Green, George Schmidt, Jean Seidenberg and Tim Trapolin.

Rex Proclamation via The New Orleans Advocate_AIE

Rex Proclamation via The New Orleans Advocate

I still wear my Mignon Faget giraffe necklace from when I was in high school and Tony Green happened to have his studio across from my parents’ condo before they sold it to new owners who then sold it to “Brangelina.”

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Another Use for the Wood Pile This Winter

Do you have a stocked wood pile? If so, then you have an opportunity for artistry.

Just look at these examples of another use for the wood pile this winter and how art is everywhere.

From where the wood comes takes on a visual meaning with this fallen tree.

Fallen Tree Wood Pile_AIE

Perhaps this layout suggests the wood pile can be moved?

Mobility Wood Pile_AIE

Or let it move itself.

Fish Wood Pile_AIE

Animals seem to be popular particularly owls.

Mobility Wood Pile_AIE

This one changes with snow and look who’s peeking out.

Bear Wood Pile_AIE

Coming across this wild boar wood pile art might scare you while walking in the woods but it’s one of my favorites.

Boar Wood Pile_AIE

Intricate human portraits can also be created with multiple types and colored wood.

Wood Pile Portraits_AIE

Or add color for a bold abstract impact that can be helpful in guiding your path.

This take a little extra digging but could be a good workout in the new year.

Colored Wood Pile_AIE

Wood piles don’t always have to be linear or laid straight in one plane, as seen in this spiral construction.

Spiral Wood Pile_AIE

They can even be a sphere, which is very unusual. I just wonder what would happen if you took one log out for the fire? 😉

Sphere Wood Pile_AIE

Speaking of a fire. This next wood pile reminds me of an oven. It uses a traditional stacked construction with the stair supports to help frame. The creative layout comes with 2 layers and a lot of wood that will keep you warm in the winter, hence the oven concept perhaps?

Under Stairs Wood Pile_AIE

Finally, this hut construction is truly artistic and more for execution than for practical use — unless, the huts can be shelters. However, I rather suspect they may have been made by Patrick Dougherty, who fashions large sculptures out of twigs and natural objects.

Wood Pile Huts_AIE

However you stack your wood pile, just know it doesn’t have to be boring and you can have fun while doing the chore.

Artistic Tradition Woven in Time and Odyssey

A quick post this week featuring the famed Venetian house of Bevilacqua textiles and their artistic tradition woven in time along with some pictures from New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA’s) 50th Odyssey Ball.

A magical setting from the 50th Odyssey Ball at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Some artwork featured Venetian Masters.

odyssey-ball-highlights on Art Is Everywhere

Odyssey Ball photos by Lorre Lei Jackson

desserts-at-odyssey-ball on Art Is Everywhere

A range of delectable desserts

Timothee Lovelock, the DJviolinist on Art Is Everywhere

Timothee Lovelock, the DJviolinist was one of the featured musicians. I like his violin!

Save

The Curious Incident of the Dog is Delightful

We saw the play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time two weeks ago. I just haven’t had time to write about it.

It was more than delightful; It was one of the best plays that I’ve seen!

It was a family affair with our older son and his wife joining us at the Kennedy Center matinée. We had front row seats in the third tier with these gorgeous starburst cluster-chandeliers above us.

kennedy-center-ceiling lights_aie

I had read the book by Mark Haddon and loved it. They were unfamiliar with the story line and it was interesting to see their heartfelt reaction for the first time. Libby teaches public high school students, so I thought she might appreciate the challenges for this teenager in the play.

 It was one of the most active and physical plays I’ve seen going from a somber moment to a super-energized cacophony. The book fully captivated me and the play even more so because it added the visual and auditory layer that the book couldn’t fully generate, except in your imagination.

Both the book and the play put you in Christopher Boone, the 15 year old protagonist’s head, as if you were the one who was experiencing what it is like to have Aspergers first hand. It is a dichotomy in that he is brilliant but unable to manage social situations easily. Everyday hectic living can present crippling sensory overload for him.

Christopher sets out to solve the mystery of the death of his neighbor’s dog, who he discovers is killed on the front lawn with a pitchfork. The adventure leads to revelations that even “normal” teens, much less adults, would be shocked to their core to learn. Because Christopher has Aspergers, a milder functioning form of autism, he takes everything at face value and in some ways is able to deal with the truth better than most.

curious-dog-play_aie

Just like when I read the book, I found myself getting uncontrolably emotional because you can’t help but be moved by Christopher’s accomplishments.

The entire set was a digital sight and sound box that was brilliantly used and constantly changing. I can’t really describe it more than let this video speak for itself — and even it doesn’t do the play justice. If you have the chance while it is on tour, it’s just something to see!

There’s a reason it has won 5 Tony awards!

Afterwards, we have a wonderful dinner at Centrolina in the new City Center area in DC. Piers company, Clark Construction, had built the project.

centrolina restaurant_aie

We sat at the table closest to the center dark wall

Centrolina drinks_AIE

Their special cocktails: a Negroni in back (without Campari) + Rimini in front with 2 different amaros, cachaca and pineapple. Both are excellent!

Views of CityCenter below.  city-center-gateway_aie

palmer-alley-city-center-dc_aie

plaza-city-center-dc-aie

Side note: Although there is so much, actually endless topics to write about, this blog may be posted 2 times a week after this post, due to the time involved to write, which I don’t have as much as I used to with other things taking some priority. Plus, I welcome reducing some of the load.

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Perfect Pink

The Paul Smith store in LA has received the most notoriety for its vivid, perfect pink exterior color. It certainly attracts attention but has increasingly attracted attention of photographers with a constant flow of selfie uploads daily. So much so, that the attention the wall brings, creates its own security guard.

Paul Smith perfect pink wall_Instagram 2_Art Is EverywhereAtlas Obscura explains the draw of the perfect pink color:

“The Paul Smith wall makes the list of almost every available “most photographed locations in Los Angeles” list…Everyone looks freaking great standing in front of it…The fact that the wall is a simple swath of color, unbroken and very, very tall, makes it curiously like a professional backdrop itself…creates a huge amount of contrast between the subject …makes it a particularly eye-catching image, especially on a small screen.

Paul Smith perfect pink wall 1_Art Is EverywhereThe size of the wall, negative space and shadows all play into the perfect pink effect. Also of interest is the fact that the color pink has been trending the last couple of years. Pantone ranked it [Rose Quartz] and Serenity Blue as its top 2 colors for 2016. You can read other posts about Pantone’s Color Forecasting here.

Paul Smith perfect pink wall_Instagram_Art Is EverywhereAtlas describes it well, “That big pink wall is something else: arty, but not exactly art; unbranded but instantly recognizable; off-the-beaten-path but hugely popular.

Paul Smith perfect pink wall 1_Art Is EverywhereJust search #pinkwall on Twitter and Paul Smith Pink Wall on Instagram to see for yourself.

I like the color and have also been dabbling with pink recently in the latest Chinoiserie collection of Casart removable and reusable wallpaper.

Casart Coverings Chinoiserie Mural Panel 4 in Dusty Pink self-adhesive wallpaper_Art Is Everywhere

Casart Chinoiserie Mural Panel 4 in Dusty Pink self-adhesive wallpaper

Save

Save

Save

Fabulous Fibonacci is Golden Art

I’ve just backed Rafael Araujo’s Kickstarter project to bring his beautiful architectural illustrations to light in an adult coloring book. Araujo is a Venezuelan architect in Caracas, who’s been using the Fibonacci Sequence or Golden Ratio for over 40 years to create his artwork.

Rafael Araujo at work_ Art Is Everywhere

Rafael Araujo at work

The Golden Ratio uses “Phyllotaxis,” which is the tendency in nature for things to grow in spiral patterns. This concept can be seen in mathematically sequenced spirals in seashells and butterflies — two of my favorite things — among many other elements that are found in Nature.

Golden Ratio shell 1_Art Is EverywhereHe’s left all the mathematical plotting points intact to show the diagram of the object he’s illustrating, similar to Leonardi’s famous image of the Vitruvian man, which in this case also shows how the circle and the Golden Ratio Rectangle come together.

Rafael Araujo_Golden Ratio Rectangle Fibonacci Spiral_ArtIsEverywhere

Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man_ArtIsEverywhere

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man via Stanford University

Golden Ratio shell 3_ Art Is Everywhere

Araujo’s shells using the Golden Ratio

Golden Ratio shell 2_Art Is Everywhere

Rafael Araujo_Blue Morpho butterflies_ArtIsEverywhere

Blue Morpho Butterflies in flight by Rafael Araujo

Casart Butterfly Logo2_Art Is Everywhere

Casart coverings Blue Morpho Logo Butterfly

I love the Blue Morpho Butterfly, as you can see above. I took these next two pictures while in Panama. It is one of the most majestic creatures. I was so excited to see them in flight, as well as leaf cutter ants at work. Pretty amazing and mesmerizing.

Blue Morpho Underside wing pattern in Panama_Art Is Everywhere

Blue Morpho Underside wing pattern in Panama

Blurry Blue Morpho eating_AIE

Blurry Blue Morpho eating

Rafael Araujo_Monarch butterflies_ArtIsEverywhere

Araujo’s Monarch Butterflies

I’m loving this coloring book because it epitomizes the apex of where art and science come together. I’m excited to receive one but more importantly, I’m very happy, Mr. Araujo and his printers have already reached their fundraising goal. I’m just pleased to be a part of the effort to bring his exceptional art to others. You can still be a part of the effort too until April 27th, so get on board and surf the Golden Ratio wave!

Golden Ratio Coloring Book_ArtIsEverywhereHere are some more links that may be of interest:

Rafael Araujo’s website

His creative process on Imgur

Math is Fun – The Fibonacci Sequence

A Fun Math Exercise in Your Garden

About the Fibonacci Sequence

Golden Ratio in relation to Fibonacci Sequence

More on Golden Rectangles

Golden Ratio Rectangle_ArtIsEverywhere

Don’t ask me to explain the math, except maybe this is why I like Spirograph so much! 😉

 

Preventing Cancer with French Flair

My husband and I were excited to be invited as guests to attend the annual Prevent Cancer Gala, held at the National Building Museum. Peter’s Committee Chairman, Congressman Fred Upton and colleague Diana DeGette were the honorees for their tireless efforts to introduce and push legislation through Congress to help find, fund and speed the process for 21st Century Cures for today’s illnesses.

Prevent Cancer Gala-2 honorees_Art Is Everywhere

Prevent Gala honoree_Art Is Everywhere

Organization President and Founder and event Chair, Carolyn Aldigé, Congressman Fred Upton and wife Amey

The theme was La Vie En Rose, which was fitting in light of the Paris terrorist attacks that linger in our collective consciousness. In fact, as I write this post, the remaining terrorist has just been caught in his hometown in Brussels. I hope the French get the information they need and that will help protect other countries from terrorist activities.

Prevent Cancer Gala La Vie En Rose_Art Is EverywhereBizzBash rates the gala as one of Washington’s top events in 2014. It was definitely decorated to the nines, complete with a huge Eiffel Tower replica at the bar with bartenders in berets serving French 75 champagne cocktails. Other French flair attributes included: cabaret dancers, antiqued-mirrored rectangular tables, beautiful floral bouquets of spring flowers in tall vases and individually set en masse down the center of the table. The food was delicious and typically French: bouillabaisse with mussels (my favorite) in a saffron aioli, charred beef tenderloin in red wine jus and cauliflower puree, poirier (pear) au chocolat (chocolate sponge cake with Poire William ice cream) and a demitasse café or tea with macaroons, cappuncino eclairs and almond madeleines. Surprisingly, this was not all that filing.

PreventCancerGala-AIE

Photo by Alfredo Flores. 22nd Annual Prevent Cancer Spring Gala?. National Building Museum. March 11, 2016_AIE

Photo by Alfredo Flores. 22nd Annual Prevent Cancer Spring Gala. National Building Museum. March 11, 2016

French 75 via Gin Foundry_Art Is Everywhere

French 75 via Gin Foundry

I wish I had taken pictures but unfortunately I got so caught up in having a good time that it was not on my radar, except for the first floor shot above. We dress up so infrequently in ballroom attire — long dress and tux — that it would have been nice to document. Dommage! Tant pis, pour les temps prochain!

Prevent Cancer Cabaret Dancers_ArtIsEverywhereYou can see many more pictures on the Prevent Cancer Organization’s Facebook page, but here are a few highlights and with some of the fun folks we met, like the Energy & Commerce Committee’s young staff.

Prevent Cancer Gala attendees_Art Is Everywhere ECC young staff strike a pose_Art Is EverywhereThe French Ambassador spoke. Andrea Roane, our local news anchor was the MC and the most clever method was used for their fundraising. Upon arriving, guests registered their cell phone and credit card with a bevy of young staffers inputting all this info on laptop computers. Guests were then sent a link on their phones to download the Prevent Cancer Org app. There was a floor auction in the bar area that could also be bid online and during the meal. This raised 1 million dollars! Another $40,000 in cash donations was raised during the evening from guests giving any increment using the app and their name would be displayed on the large teleprompters that were conveniently located on either side of the room. These really helped everyone see and hear the speakers as well as stay informed about the fundraising, which cleverly became a competition with those who gave not only pressing others to donate with their names flashing for all to see but anyone who contributed was handed a flashing necklace. You wouldn’t want to be caught without one. Smart!!

Prevent Cancer Gala table arrangements_Art Is Everywhere

Table arrangement. Photo by Josh Hartman

The most impressive thing, however, remains what this organization does with all the dollars it receives.

Prevent Cancer Gala-3_Art Is Everywhere Prevent Cancer Gala-4_Art Is EverywhereThis is a quick update. “Who” knew Roger Daltrey of The Who fame, would be involved in the 21st Century Cures regarding his effort with childhood cancers through Teen Cancer America, the organization he founded with Pete Townsand. This can be viewed via the Energy and Commerce Committee hearing just yesterday.

Roger Daltrey testifies on hill_Art Is Everywhere

Mosaic Brick Murals and Snow Steps

While searching information for a post, I happened upon artist Charis Tsevis, via Creative Boom, who creates the most interesting African portrait murals using digitally-painted, mosaic bricks. These colorful blocks are comprised of various African patterns with references to African culture. You would think all the patterns would render an image flat or make it appear discombobulating but the portraits have amazing depth and come alive with color.

African Mosaic Brick Portrait Mural for Sasi via Creative Boom on Art Is EverywhereThe murals were created for Sasi’s, his wife’s family’s African restaurant in Athens, Greece and are printed over a textured plywood to give further dimension.

African Mosaic Bricks for Sasi via Creative Boom4_on Art Is Everywhere

The murals depict every day life events in various African tribes, including the Zulus — the very tribe for which a famous New Orleans Krewe is named and that was mentioned during recent Mardi Gras festivities.

African Mosaic Bricks for Sasi via Creative Boom3_Art Is EverywhereThe murals pay tribute to the artist’s deep affection for Africa and its constant inspiration.

African Mosaic Bricks for Sasi via Creative Boom2_Art Is EverywhereBeyond these beautiful pieces hanging in Sasi’s, there are many well-known clients who also appreciate Tsevis’ artwork.

Going full spectrum in the other direction with absence of color and change in temperature, there are two snow artists getting attention making their own detailed murals but, step by step by step. Too bad their artwork doesn’t last longer than the cold weather, however.

It is interesting to see these artists’ different styles.

 It’s a lot of extra shoveling but Semen Bukharin, a Russian Janitor, creates lovely snow murals with a shovel (via Mother Nature Network).

Semen Bukharin snow mural 3_Art Is Everywhere

via Mother Nature Network

snow-murals_Semen Bukharin_Art Is EverywhereMany of the murals are whimsical, yet intricate, using folk depictions taken from Russian and Nordic references as well as even an African Safari.

Semen Bukharin snow mural 2_Art Is EverywhereSemen Bukharin4_African Safari Snow Mural_Art Is EverywhereAnother style of snow murals can be seen in British snow-artist Simon Beck’s geometric, snow murals on Powder Mountain, Utah. He creates elaborate “snowflakes” with footprints using snow shoes, as described on the Standard Examiner.

Simon Beck Snow Mural 1_Art Is Everywhere

images via Standard Examiner

Simon Beck Snow Mural 2_Art Is Everywhere Simon Beck Snow Mural 3_Art Is Everywhere Simon Beck Snow Mural 4_Art Is Everywhere Simon Beck Snow Mural 5_Art Is Everywhere Simon Beck Snow Mural 6_Art Is EverywhereIt may seem less arduous than shoveling but there’s a lot of ground to cover and walking in the snow is a workout. Fortunately, he has some helpers above!

Be sure to click this video from Digg to hear a snippet directly from Simon Beck about his murals, see his process and some other beautiful ones that he’s stepped in snow.

Simon Beck Snow Mural video_Art Is EverywherePS: As this post publishes today, this story about Simon Beck is receiving global attention. Here are two more on Colossal and Daily Mail, which shows how he’s been able to monetize his snow murals = smart!

Something New for a Happy New Year

Happy New Year!

This just may be the year to try something new.

For instance, if cleaning clutter and starting with fresh palette in your home is an objective, then find ways to use old things, like using old catalogs to make decorative Christmas trees that you can give as gifts for next year. Check off list early — Christmas gifts for next year are already done and catalogs gone. Cheers!

Christmas catalog tree on Art Is EverywhereYou can also recycle using Freecycle, where one man’s trash is another’s treasure. Post what you don’t want, leave it outside your house and chances are, someone will answer the call and pick up as theirs to claim.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...