Summer Schedule

Hello readers, with the summer schedule and needing to put forth extra energy and effort to my main CasartCoverings.com website and migrating the Slipcovers for your walls blog to an updated version, the posts on this blog will move to a temporary and limited, twice-a-month schedule.

Thank you for your continued interest as art oriented observations will still be posted, just not as frequently, like this little video-ditty about the singer Miquel’s creative process, on NPR’s Noteworthy series.

NPR_creative process film_AIE

I’ve listened to but not all that familiar with Miguel’s music and only like some of it, particularly the rhythm and blues, funk and more psychedelic-soul / lounge oriented pieces, but his thought process regarding creating music and how the artist is affected is surprisingly very thoughtful. I enjoyed learning more about him and his music as he discusses the inspiration for his latest music and video. He states the importance of being in the moment to absorb those bits of creative sparks that are so quickly fleeting. He recalls his time on the beach in letting those moments flow. I’ll be thinking of this as vacation to the beach is quickly coming and I don’t want to bring too much work this time. Click the image below to view.

Personally, I like his custom wallpaper šŸ˜‰

Miguel wallpaper_AIE

Go ahead and subscribe (sidebar link) to this blog so you won’t miss out and won’t have to remember to check back. This way the posts will come to your inbox.

Hope you enjoy the rest of the summer and finding art is everywhere.

A Thermodynamic Mural View

This post is just in time for some summer July heat, especially just after celebrating a Fourth of July holiday weekend.

As featured on Creativity, Lennox, the air conditioning/ cooling and heating company, has partnered with 5 street artists for them to paint L.A. murals using thermodynamic / thermochromic paint. The paint changes with the temperature while the murals morph into new images. There are basically 2 murals in one. Pretty spectacular!

This octopus mural named Adaptive by Bacon changes just like in real life.

It makes me think of one of my favorite books, The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery.

Adaptive Octopus thermochromic mural by Bacon_Art Is Everywhere

Click this link to read more and see the full video, which is really creative and well done.

Thermochomic paint video_via Creativity on Art Is Everywhere

via Creativity

Here are the other Degrees of Perfect video teasers for reference.

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A News Mixology

This is a quick bit of news mixology, as I’m working on new designs and extra time for a longer post isn’t at hand.

  1. While not expressing my own political inclinations (at all ;), I can still state that with politics on everyone’s minds these days and the latest primary just past, this is a worthwhile mural posting of Bernie Sanders y Conrad Brenner, located in Philly (to see on our next trip).

    Bernie Sanders Mural by Conrad Benner via Philadelphia Weekly_Art Is Everywhere

    Bernie Sanders Mural by Conrad Benner via Philadelphia Weekly

  2. Before you go, check out this list from USA Today on the 10 best cities to see murals.
    10 Great Cities to see Murals_USA_ Art Is Everywhere

    10 Great Cities to see Murals_USA

    3. If you have nothing better to do on April 26th, here’s an interesting Christie’s auction to look forward to snagging some historically prestigious trompe l’oeil panels.

Christies auction_ArtIsEverywhereThe panels are painted by Martin Battersby for Lady Diana Cooper, who sounds like she was a rebel rouser.

martin-battersby-1914-1982-pleasures-of-life via Christies on Art Is Everywhere

martin-battersby-1914-1982-pleasures-of-life via Christie’s

Lady Diana Cooper_via Christies_Art Is Everyhwere4. I am very excited to learn there will be a sequel to the movie Finding Nemo, called Finding Dory, coming out this June.

Finding Dory Sequel to Finding Emo_We Got this covered_Art Is EverywhereI have 2 Clown Fish in my tank due to the first movie and because they are very hearty fish. No telling what I’ll get next. šŸ˜‰

I’ll take this opportunity to mention that in the midst of my Month of Celebrations, sadly, I lost the very first fish in our salt-water tank, my Cardinalfish (Banggai). He was 5 years old. They normally last only 4 years in a tank and maybe 2 years in the wild. His demise is still somewhat of a mystery in that he had symptoms that none of the other fish had with a what looked like a white bulbous tumor under but partly visible from his right gill. He had progressive fin and tail rot that I hadn’t noticed until it appeared too late. This is normally a sign of bad water conditions but I change the tank regularly, check the chems and this did not seem to be the case. I did a little research (WebMD for fish) and found that many owners of this type of fish had similar symptoms. It could have been related to food and a virus that was affecting those in captivity. I can’t say for certain but since the frozen brine shrimp I was using is from China (as is most things these days) and even though, it says free of bacteria and diseases, do we really know for sure or if this is even regulated there? Perhaps it transported the virus that infects only this type of fish. Evidently they are now hard to come by because they have been over-fished for aquariums and the disease has affected so many.

It was very sad to see him wither away because he got to the point where he could not swim and the other fish were picking on him. At one point he appeared to be getting better with the antibiotics I was treating him and the tank with to also proactively protect the other fish; although it only seemed that the Cardinalfish was prone to this disease. When the medicine was finished and it was time to do my weekly water change he rapidly declined. He’s buried in the Memory Garden with very healthy plants due to the other fish buried nearby.

He was a very pretty and fast swimming fish with striking markings. He often outwitted the other fish getting prime food morsels before they could. He’d often break dried shrimp pellets apart spit them out for others to eat along with him.

Going back to The Soul of an Octopus, even fish have a personality and he had a good one. I’ll miss him but he brought a lot of joy.

Cardinal Banggai Fish_Art Is Everywhere

Cardinal Banggai Fish

Cloud Formations

Along with a month of celebrations, comes the pressure with lack of time to create new designs, which I’m trying to complete now for a presentation. In light of this, this will be a quick post on beautiful cloud formations as seen in this time-lapse video (via Gothamist) of artist James Wall Finn painting a ceiling mural panel for New York Public Library’s Bill Blass Catalog Room.

Cloud Mural_NewYork Public Library_Art Is EverywhereI find this quite inspiring, especially with other Cloud Murals that I’ve created and always looking to do more. Clouds are pretty amazing, always forming something new.

This is what the library’s sky mural looked like before — pretty dark. The new mural will be light and airy and certainly help to open up the space.

NYPL prev cloud mural 1_via Gothamist_Art Is Everywhere NYPL prev cloud mural 2_via Gothamist_Art Is Everywhere

The Art of Speaking

I was posting on the Slipcovers for Your Walls blog for Casart coverings about Apple’s latest run in with the FBI about providing a backdoor entry on their devices in relation to their existing home technology, when I came a several great videos on Fast Company.

You could say these videos below explain how there is an art to the well-crafted interview, so the interview questions are perceived the way that one wants the interviewee to hear.

Art of Speaking_interviewing_FastCompany_on Art Is EverywhereOtherwise, the interview becomes a classic case of you say this but this is what they hear.

Actually there’s an art to speaking in general, so keep watching the second video. It humorously shows the double speak within office meetings.

Too funny and too true! (from Fast Company)

If you want to see more, head on over to the Slipcovers for Your Walls blog post on Apple Wants to Unlock Your Door.

Racing Extinction

After watching the film Racing Extinction, I thought it deserving of a blog post, because not only is it well done,* I like animals andĀ  I’ve posted about efforts to save sharks and others before but it uses art to get its point across. In writing this post, I realized there have been a series of coincidental confluent events taking place in the process.

manta ray digital obscura projection on Art Is Everywhere

Majestic Manta Rays are just some of the animals featured and with a positive outcome.

At the time of this writing, the film has had over 11.5 million viewers, and just the other day, the video sound collaborators projected inspirational images of near extinct animals on the outside of the Vatican. Confluence #1: I just posted about the Pope and a mural created in his honor in my last post.

Racing Extinction on Art Is EverywhereOK, the location and animation in itself is pretty amazing. Just watch. Note: it requires patience for it starts after 10 minutes of silence with a lot of pauses and shots of the audience at night with only camera phones visible. It’s a meditative piece that is different than the Racing Extinction film but serves a similar purpose. There is no commentary only images and sounds of the animals with beautiful transitions. This gives a lot of time for reflection, which is the objective after all.

You’ll be amazed at how many animals are on the extinction list. Most all of the butterflies that I have painted + my clown fish in my fish tank (precisely because they are in people’s fish tanks and coral reef depletion). These are just to name a few that will hit home.

butterfly digital obscura 1 on Art Is Everywherebutterfly digital obscura 2 on Art Is Everywherebutterfly digital obscura 3 on Art Is Everywhereclown fish digital obscura projection on Art Is EverywhereI had already sent the film information to my husband, who happens to be attending the Climate Change Conference (COP 21) in Paris, thinking he might see the Racing Extinction folks in attendance. No report yet but coincidentally and yet probably strategically planned to market the film a the time of this climate change conference. Confluence #2. Instead, I received a beautiful picture of Paris, “the city of [Christmas / holiday] lights.”

Side note: I enjoyed watching the U2 Live concert the same night they just played in Paris. I always wanted to see them play live and I felt like I was there. There were a lot of moving moments and it was incredible how immediate the news was about it, with thoughts of Paris and San Bernadino and terrorism on everyone’s minds.

Paris Lights on Art Is EverywhereBesides man over fishing and killing animals, the film claims that the extinction of some animals is due to climate change. *Here’s where my politics differ to some degree but this is not a political blog so I won’t belabor points here because it’s been a roundabout argument from both sides of the subject. I’ll just say that I agree that some sensible steps to reduce carbon and methane emissions should be carefully considered and where adversely and economically impacted, there has to be a mutual meeting ground in order to get results. I do not believe man is completely in control of the world’s climate — that would be a tall and bold and almost arrogant “projection” to make when the world’s natural climate is changing all the time and there are larger forces than just man alone contributing. Nonetheless, the Racing Extinction group has a petition started on their website, if you’d like to join.

Confluence #3. I had mentioned I had written about efforts helping animal extinction before. This is the film’s main focus. OK, man is one of those animals but primarily it is about other animals with whom we share the planet. The manta ray and rare birds are among some. Confluence #4 will be in a separate post documenting the history of the world’s birds in a mural just completed and about which I just received the story alert at the time of this writing.

Regarding the Oceanic Preservation Society’s film production team: One of the photographers, Joel Sartore, creator of the Photo Arc [I’d like to feature in a single blog post, it is so impressive] and in fact the director, Louie Psihoyos, all work and have worked for the National Geographic, a publication I have been a long time supporter of and even took over my father’s subscription from 1921. I’m still wondering what to do with all the magazines because I’m running out of space, but I renew each year. The visuals and stories are worth reading and I like to support its efforts as well as its photographers, like Stephen Alvarez, about whom I’ve written before. Confluence #5.

Finally, this large-scale film projection is created and “performed” by Obscura Digital, behind the creative force of Travis Threlkel its founder and projection mapping. It is another group about which I’ve featured in a blog post (Confluence #6). Their creative concept is to use not only the Vatican but other buildings while traveling around in a Tesla and projecting on surfaces as moving graffiti if you will is both clever, ambitious and innovative. I’m in awe of the entire production from conception to execution to strategically creating the necessary buzz to spread the word, that there is one thing everyone can do. This in itself, may be an initial start to seeing results. I’ve already started…

Jake Weidmann Wields a Mighty Pen

I ran across this video below about Jake Weidmann and his Master Penmanship, which is beyond just writing. His calligraphy, illustration, artwork and control over the pen just blew me away. I know how easy it is to mess up. He does to, Considering the detail involved in his work, it’s hard to imagine how many times he might have to start over to have a perfect version. I gave up perfection a long time ago but certainly can appreciate it as well as some human flaws that might add character.

I wasn’t familiar with his work but he wields a mighty pen.

He’s passionate about maintaining the human touch to art. The physical activity of putting pen to paper is strong enough to link the brain with intelligence, communication and engagement and learning beyond what just modern email or phone call, for that matter, can do.

Handwriting as we know it is inspired by Nature and how we interpret it. Writing for him is drawing and an artistic form of expression.

His art form calls for the necessity of making sure every human knows how to physically draw a letter onto paper. Bringing back the art form of writing letters is more than just nostalgic, it is a serious, time-labored endeavor with significant long-term meaning.

For instance would the Constitution have the same significance if it was an email?

In an age when we’re all moving to be more cloud based, which I certainly follow suit for convenience and backups, I also realize that “Digitality” loses permanence! Hard copy lasts, even if it does take up physical space. There is something “noteworthy” in the physical “indelibility” and maintaining a sense of dynamic culture through handwriting.

Weidmann is a true Renaissance man, not only mastering the pen but carving, creating them, building and carving a frame for his Master Penman certificate, that he wrote, illustrated and made — all art forms in and of themselves — but centered around the humble but mighty pen.

Jake Weidmann_Mightier_on Art is EverywhereJake Weidmann_Steward painting on Art IS EverywherHis handmade pens are beautiful but all sold out except this one.

Jake Weidmann_ergonomic pen on Art Is EverywhereAs he so eloquently says, “the written word gives such powerful life to [his] artwork.” And, I’d say in life. His portrait of Christ below was created in one single pen stroke!

Jake Weidmann_single stroke portrait of Christ on Art Is Everywhere

A Penumbra Performance

I often overlook trending videos in email promos from YouTube but for some reason this one caught my attention. It’s a pretty spectacular performance from a 13 member,Ā all-Filipino troupe called, El Gamma Penumbra. They perform shadow dances with a message. This one happens to be about the dual character of Mother Nature — both beautiful and powerful.

They were vying to win Asia’s Got Talent, and they did!

Here are more visuals of previous performances leading up to the winning one.

Click here for previous posts on Shadow Performances.

How Has the World Changed in Your Lifetime?

This was a very cool interactive site I “stumbled” upon that is a welcome distraction from life about how has the world changed within your lifetime. It’s a little environmental at the end but the results will be different for everyone.

Artistic in the concept.

Here’s just one example of the many things shown.

one example of world change within a lifetime on Art Is Everywhere

Click here to customize for your life on earth adventure.

BBC_How life on earth has changed in your lifetime on Art Is Everywhereand a nice way to end this post with a stunning visual of the earth being lit.

Although the video just ends too abruptly, it music reminds me of one of my favorite pieces of music, Sentimental Walk by Vladmir Cosma, from Diva, one of my favorite movies.

Here’s a beautiful poetic, visual version.

If you want to listen to one of the most beautiful operatic performances just listen to Wilhelmenia Wiggins Fernadez singing an aria from La Wally. This has stuck with me since the first time I heard it over 30 years ago. It is timeless.

A Newly Discovered, Egyptian Archeological Wonder

Ancient Egyptian murals were recently discovered near Luxor during the archeological mapping of Sheik Abd Qurna, which is a courtyard known as Theban Tomb 110.

Egyptian Murals on Art Is Everywhere

Egyptian tomb photos via i09.com

Egyptian Mural Detail on Art Is EverywhereThe murals are 3,500 years old and in spectacular condition, except for the sad fact that they have already been subjected to some vandalism.

Egyptian Murals on Art Is EverywhereOn a side note, when I saw members of ISIS (ironic to me that the acronym is also an Egyptian Goddess) destroying ancient artifacts recently, it just sickened me. I don’t know why anyone would want to destroy art, especially that which documents culture and is an antiquity. When you see it happen, as they are systematically doing, you can only conclude that they want to wipe out all existence of humanity (past and present) which would even include their own history. Upsetting, strange and incomprehensible.

There really isn’t a lot of space to work or even stand but the decoration covers every corner, including the ceiling, which is fantastic!

Egyptian Murals on Art Is EverywhereLook at the entrance. Hard to believe it was even discovered, it could be easily overlooked.

Egyptian Mural Tomb Entrance on Art Is EverywhereEgyptian Murals on Art Is Everywhere

Not only is the full story on these newly discovered Egyptian murals and more pictures worth viewing on io9.com but the comments are hysterically funny, from arguing about the figures’ skin tones to adding in the Alien Creature where a vandalized section seemed to “take out” one of the figures, to my favorite, King Tut — Steve Martin’s portrayal.

Egyptian Murals_ Wardrobe malfunction Comment_on Art Is EverywhereEgyptian Murals_ Same Dress Comment_on Art Is EverywhereEgyptian Murals_ Persona non grata comment_on Art Is EverywhereEgyptian Murals_ Alen Comment_on Art Is EverywhereSteve Martin King Tut on Art is Everywhere

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