Thievery Stole the Show

We attended the Thievery Corporation Concert at the Kennedy Center last week. It was a one night show and I was glad to get affordable tickets with great seats in the front orchestra!

We attended the first performance. It was the first time Thievery Corporation had played at the Kennedy Center. Their normal venues might be less-upscale concert halls. This performance was a collaborative effort with Mason Bates, the Kennedy Center’s Composer-in-Residence. It was part of the KC Jukebox, which is a studio-lab that experiments with blending acoustic sounds. This was the first time to my knowledge that Thievery Corporation had the accompaniment of a full symphonic orchestra. The conductor was Teddy Abrams, Director of the  Louisville, KY Orchestra.

Before entering the concert hall, we enjoyed a glass of wine with nuts on the Concourse overlooking the Potomac River. The weather was gorgeous, sunny, 70’s and breezy. You almost didn’t want to go inside. I wish I had taken a picture but it wouldn’t capture it entirely. Here’s the Center Hall instead.

Kennedy Center Hall 1_AIE Kennedy Center Hall 2_AIE

Upon entering the concert hall there was heavy bass, electronic music by 2 DJ’s out of Chicago, Striz and Justin Reed. The music was in keeping with Thievery Corporation’s style of mixed funk, hip-hop, ambient, soul, techno, lounge with an international-cultural-bent. After Mason Bates’ composition, The Rise of Exotic Computing, (with some Radiohead-phonic inspiration) was played by the NSO Orchestra along with a more classical Astor Piazzola (finale from Sinforietta), then the showstopper started.

I’ve been listening to Eric Hilton and Rob Garza of Thievery Corporation with their own genre of lounge-style-music for 20+ years but had never heard them live. I still enjoy their Jet Society CD they produced and the actual 18th Street Lounge DC venue, where I remember some of the best dancing to African-beat rythyms. Their music adapts and it never gets old. In fact, there were fans of all ages including those in my age group, who had even brought their teenage children for the next generation to discover Thievery. The symphonic arrangements only added to the full experience. They played a few of their classics like: Richest Man in Babylon, Sweet Tides, Lebanese Blonde (below – I love the sitar and trumpet mix with sultry singing) and others from their newest album, The Temple of I & I, which is heavily based on Jamaican beats.

This video gives real insight into their creative process while recording in KEXP studio in November 2016.

Here’s a great review of the performance we enjoyed from DC Metro Theater Arts, describing the perfect combination between club and concert hall. Everyone was dancing in their seat with lots of head-bobbing.

Here’s a composite of some video clips and photos I took of the performance.

There were so many good songs to share; however, you’ll see more professional versions in these below that present the songs in their best light. Both are sung by LouLou, who sings many of their songs and in other languages. Interestingly, the second video I recognize is filmed at the National Gallery of Art’s concourse. Cool!

You can view some behind the scenes photos from the concert on their Facebook Page.

Seeing the Depth of My Soul video. Makes me think of Scandinavia…

This audience photo by Rob Myers shows the view from the stage. This could have been after the second performance because I don’t recognize those who would be on the right side near us but I think I see myself, which is weird, and I remember them taking the picture.

Attendees at Thievery Corporation Concert DC on AIE

Afterwards, we ate at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Restaurant, which was pretty good and then walked around the entire center on the rooftop terrace. It was such a lovely night that we’re considering becoming Kennedy Center members.

Kennedy Center Terrace_AIE

Outside Kennedy Center_AIE

Catch Thievery Corporation at one of these upcoming tour dates. They’ll steal you away from the present surreal-real world, at least for a little while, with their music.

In the meantime, you can go to the 18th Street Lounge, where Thievery Corporation got their start, and is the namesake to their affiliate ESL record label. You can also enjoy some of the many restaurants around town owned by Eric and his brother, Ian Hilton. The Brighton is the latest, coming to the exciting Wharf Development this fall, along with other venues. But for now, The new Pod Hotel will host their Crimson Diner and View (opening in June & July) — another place to enjoy a good drink and dinner! Looks like a great view of the city too on the rooftop!

Pod Hotel DC home lobby on Art Is Everywhere

Pod Hotel home lobby

Crimson Diner_View_Pod Hotel_AIE

via Pod Hotel DC

Wharf Development Rendering via Washingtonian on AIE

via Washingtonian

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A Celebratory Week to Remember

Well it was a fun, celebratory week to remember — one for the recollection record books!

Easter Sunday started it off — after a month of prep with finally getting a new garage roof completed. We still have some refinement to do so I’ll have to post a picture later. My Clivia plant, also known as a Kaffir Lily, seemed to be waiting to bloom on this special occasion. How appropriate and really beautiful this African plant is. My father-in-law gave it to me with multiple “babies” as offshoots that I divided and gave to my sister and sons. I’m waiting to hear if theirs’ bloomed.

Kaffir Lily blooms on Art Is Everywhere

Other plants that are flourishing are on our roof. The two types of butter/bib and arugula lettuce are three times the size of this now and nearly ready to harvest. Snap beans, beets and cauliflower seeds are coming along. I’ll need to replant the carrots though.

Rooftop Garden GlowPear Containers on AIE

You can read more about these hydroponic GlowPear planters on Houzz, where we purchased a second one.

My husband was able to get tickets through his office to the National Museum of African American History & Culture (NMAAHC), which is near impossible since they are sold out already through July. There was a special viewing between 8 – 10 am midweek and I took my friend Liza. Although we needed Peter with us to enter, he decided not to attend in order for us to be able to when security discovered my miniature pairing knife in my purse that I had forgotten all about. Ugh!! They wouldn’t let me leave it with them so Peter took it back to his car and missed the museum opportunity but he’ll get more tickets. He also had a meeting that was going to shorten his time anyway and you really need a full day, as we discovered, to take it all in. We didn’t return home until 4:30. It took over 7 hours to go through at a leisurely pace, which you need to do to be able to read and process all the info. Fortunately, I had cleared my work calendar in advance. There is a tremendous amount to cover and the museum does a good job of showing viewers the progression of the African American history through three sub-terrain, what I call the “oppressive” concourses that move through the start of Slavery to Freedom > Defending Freedom and Segregation > Changing America 1968 & Beyond. Although there is still a sense of uncertainty at the end of the exhibit, one leaves with a positive appreciation of the African American history and all its accomplishments as well as the strength of the American Spirit.

The African American experience is the lens through which we understand what it is to be an American. — Lonnie Bunch (Founding Director)

NMAAHC museum building on AIE

NMAAHC museum

The first sense one has upon entering the museum is from the exterior grill work that suppresses the light, yet fills the space with ornamentation. It is supposed to recall the grill work in New Orleans that was made by slave labor and you do get a sense, especially in the lower galleries, of being in a cargo hold of a slave ship with only one way up and out.

NMAAHC grill work on Art Is Everywhere

You start at the bottom and walk through each concourse and move onto the next via ramps. There are no elevators or restrooms on any of these floors. If the intent was to be somewhat uncomfortable, then it works. There are, however, plenty of places to sit and rest, watch a movie, reflect or just take a break. I had to use the restroom and needed to walk all the way up while Liza rested. There was a placard at the top warning that once you exited you could not re-enter. I had to flag someone down to ask them if I could come back in. Although it wasn’t a problem, I can’t imagine the planners didn’t think this common occurrence through. It must happen a lot. There were hoards of people in line a this point and we were only half way through the exhibit. I hustled back to get a move on before it became crowded. It was starting to on the third concourse, especially when we visited the Emmett Till Memorial, where no pictures were allowed. This was a horrible event about a 14 year old African American boy who was lynched simply because some “white” folk were looking to make examples of blacks. The outcome is what sparked insurgence, uprising and riots, along with the tragic death of Martin Luther King. However, the final part of the main exhibit shows the progression of the African Americans to assimilate within the middle class, become major TV and music celebrities. In fact, America has a lot to be thankful for with their cultural contribution.

Colonial Slavery figures on Art Is Everywhere

Prominent Colonial historical figures including Thomas Jefferson and Mum Bet, who sued the State of Massachusetts to win her freedom and consequently abolished slavery in MA

Ashley's Sack 1 NMAAHC on AIE

This story is pretty heartbreaking. There were many that were but this one spoke to me.

Ashley's Sack 2 NMAAHC on AIE

It was interesting to note that at the very start of the Slave Trade, which was sparked by the sugar trade, Creole Africans were wealthy diplomats and highly sought after for their language capabilities and cultural knowledge.

Concourse 3 - 2 NMAAHC on AIE

Moving from Concourse 3 to 2

slave and free houses at NMAAHC on Art Is Everywhere

Juxtaposition between Slave House on lower Concourse 3 and Freed Slave’s own home on upper Concourse 2

Stereotypes at NMAAHC on AIE

Stereotypes in toys and paraphenalia

Segregated clinic hours at NMAAHC on AIE

These segregated clinic hours are hard to believe in this current time

Maple Leaf Rag on AIE

My parents used to dance to the Maple Leaf Rag

Angola guard station_interactive bar at NMAAHC on AIE

Angola Prison Guard Station and the Interactive “Segregation Bar” where you can follow a movement as if you’re a member

Soul Train on Art Is Everywhere

1968 & Beyond brings up Soul Train, which was big part of my childhood

Assimilating into Middle America on Art Is Everywhere

Assimilating into Middle America

Another Rat Pack Digs on Art Is Everywhere

The other Rat Pack Digs in Chicago

Foxy Brown and Sly and Family Stone on AIE

Foxy Brown movies still play on TV and notice Sly & Family Stone written on his piano keys

Main NMAAHC exhibit end on AIE

Main exhibit ends with highlights from the 2000’s like Hurricane Katrina and the Obama Administration, how could we forget.

We decided to break for lunch. The food at the Sweet Home Cafe was excellent! You could choose which regional fare you wanted to try. Of course I went right for the Creole Southern Duck / Andouille Sausage Gumbo but then changed my mind at the last-minute to get the Shrimp and Grits because the shrimp were gigantic! The meal was delicious and a generous portion! The dining hall was in the shape of the “ark” or museum Congo ship, yet each layer had vines growing in the indented, internal troughs. The back walls were mirrored to make the space look twice as large as what we thought it could hold. We didn’t wait around for that test because the buses of people were now streaming in.

Panoramic Mall view from the top of NMAAHC on AIE

Panoramic Mall view from the top

Looking down on the Gift Shop on AIE

Looking down on the Gift Shop

Reproductions of Mary Jackson's baskets in the gift shop on AIE

Reproductions of Mary Jackson’s baskets in the gift shop

After a much needed energy refresh, we tackled the top four floors. Similarly to the sub-floors, where you start at the bottom and walk up, we started in reverse at the very top and moved downward. We visited all the floors but only experienced three. There were elevators and escalators and restrooms on all of these. The top floor Culture Galleries was my favorite. It showed the importance of the African American culture in food, music, arts, fashion, and sports. I by-passed the last, but fully savored all the others. I was just as impressed with the exhibition layout as I was with the rich content. The first oval room had double display bays with the interior, bench-seating to the double-sided, wall-alcoves with a musical entertainment-video that changed visuals with the continuous music that wrapped around the top of the room. We moved from here to the Visual Art Gallery with primarily contemporary art (not my thing) to the Musical Achievement wing with Chuck Berry’s car greeting us at the entry. I breezed through the Theatre section and will have to go back.

Food & Culture greet you on the top 4th floor of NMAAHC on AIE

Food & Culture greet you on the top 4th floor. Chef Leah Chase is prominently featured with her Dooky Chase restaurant in New Orleans.

Earth Wind & Fire at NMAAHC on AIE

Earth Wind & Fire is one of my favorite bands highlighted in the Musical component

Allen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz sectionAllen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz section on AIE

Allen Toussaint is mentioned in the Jazz section

Level 3 housed the Community Galleries, where some of the main exhibit details were further explored. For instance, there was an entire room dedicated to Muhammad Ali, another section to Ben Carson, and another to the Military Experience. Maybe I missed it, but I didn’t see any recognition given to Clarence Thomas but did see Thurgood Marshal and Anita Hill mentioned in regard to the Supreme Court. There were also mini exhibits dedicated to Making a Way Out of No Way with progress in medical, religion and school, etc., highlighted.

We didn’t have enough energy to explore the Explore More Gallery on the 2nd level, which was mainly interactive exhibits. I popped my head in and saw one older white woman, who was the only one dancing to an instructional video by an African American dance troupe. Others were watching and encouraging her as if she was playing “Wei” by herself but doing a pretty good job.

We took an Uber home and had an interesting discussion with our American-Cuban driver, Marisol about the experience. Funny, we missed Oprah by one day, as she was there the next day to screen the Henrietta Lacks movie airing on HBO. I read the book several years ago and am interested to see the movie. It’s definitely a story that needs more exposure.

Earlier in the week, Peter and I celebrated our wedding anniversary by finally visiting the Trump Hotel to see how the Old Post Office was revamped. We had drinks in the main lobby, which is huge but well decorated. The main architecture and iron struts of the original building remained and painted gold. I liked the peacock, teal blue and green velvet seating paired with amber and gold throughout the expansive room. The bar wall was mirrored to the top and filled with clear glass decanters and glasses situated on dark mahogany shelving. Very impressive. Two large TV’s were playing Fox News. We were seated next to what had to be a bevy of beautiful friends of The Real Housewives of DC. No kidding. This was entertaining to say the least.

Trump International Hotel anniversary for drinks on AIE

Trump International Hotel anniversary for drinks. The ladies had left by this point.

Trump Hotel Bar area on Art Is Everywhere

Although the ambience was captivating, the service was off. We had to call someone over after 15 minutes. They gave us water and nuts without napkins and the hostess took our initial order. The place was nearly filled but not that busy. We sampled the signature cocktails, which were unfortunately too expensive at $25 – $29 and actually did not taste very good, which is too bad! We stuck with wine and cheese choices which were good and surprisingly affordable. All in all, it was a different way to celebrate an off-year; even though, there can be some improvements made, especially if you’re expecting the best.

Trump DC Hotel at night on AIE

Trump DC Hotel at night

Meanwhile, the rest of the week was enjoying the gorgeous spring weather. Even the cats seemed to relish this indoors and out.

Cats sleeping on AIE

This picture cracks me up. These cats sleep so differently.

Cats outside on AIE

Ingrid enjoys outside on AIE

Ingrid just turned 1 year old

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Beck and the Realization that Happy is Hard

I was delighted to read the Art of Sound story in the New York Times Magazine recently and even happier to discover Beck (Hansen) was one of the three iconic musicians profiled, along with Lamar Kendrick and Tom Waits.

Beck via NYTimes magazine on Art Is Everywhere

Beck via NYTimes Magazine

Wyatt Mason, the article’s author, describes music as the art form that “unlike a painting cannot reach out and turn your head as you walk by” or like other art forms that mandate engagement, “songs live in the air.” The more creative of my two sons perceptively thinks that music is the truest art form in that is “speaks” to everyone. Personally, I think it is up to the listener to hear music — by being “open” to hearing.

Beck is one of my favorite musicians. Not only do I love his music, his creative genius but his ability to create his own music independent of what might be a best seller. Morning Phase, his most recent creation, did just that though without the intention. It received the Grammy for Album of the Year in 2014 — and well deserved. Interestingly, I never heard any of the songs from this collection played on the main-stream radio; I confess, to which I hardly listen to anymore but was listening to in 2014. It occurred to me that the songs must have gained their popularity through online-radio-streaming. This is exactly where we (my husband and I) heard it first — streaming on the Morning Phase Radio through Apple iTunes Radio that is now our go-to radio station. Listening to any of these songs, particularly Blue Moon and Morning, can help center my distracted thoughts and calm stress anytime during the day.

Beck_Morning_Phase on Art Is Everywhere

I’m naturally curious about what next phase of songs Beck will put out. Imagine my surprise to discover while reading the article that he must believe in a Big Magic moment too. He tells the story of how he had met Pharrell (Williams) in the studio and having “this strong feeling that he wanted to work with him.” In fact, he had a strong feeling about writing happy songs for “a number of years.” It never happened and Pharrell told Beck that he had just produced this song called, “Happy.” Well, we all know how that took off….!

Beck doesn’t beat himself up but I think he believes that the timing just wasn’t right for him for this type of song and besides, he concedes Pharrell, “kinda nailed this one.” We all have to agree but the idea was out there for someone’s taking. The more it is thought of, I think the more it comes to life — at least for someone. Side note: This is the exact sequence that did happen to me and coincidentally right after describing Big Magic in a previous post.  My big idea that I had been working on for months was ready to unveil but I couldn’tl until my website was completed. Technology was my hold up and the unveiling of my idea was hijacked by another company. Although, the design styles and quality of the materials are not the same, the concept was. Although frustrating, you just keep going and enjoy that you’ve created something — and that you had a good idea.

Beck’s next phase of songs are as Mason describes, “huge, dance floor-ready” with a “whole new sonic range” and “nothing like Beck has done before.” I’ve heard this song on my Beck radio but since other artists play on it, I wasn’t aware it was Beck.

Even though Beck describes happy songs similar to comedy in that they are the “easiest to fail at” because they are the “hardest to write,” I bet he’s done a pretty good job and I’m eager to hear more of the outcome.

When asked when is he his happiest, Beck answered, as a true artist would,
“My most alive place is in the moment of, maybe not fulfillment, but where there’s the possibility.”

I can relate. For me, it’s the enthusiasm, the excitement and the inspiration of the discovery of something that is and could be really good. The doing to make it a reality is the hard part. There is satisfaction in the completion but it is not the same as the initial possibility and its exuberance.

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Angelic Music in 3-D Sistine Chapel

Here is a link that you can have active in the background in your browser to listen to angelic music with a 3-D Sistine Chapel tour.

Angelic Music_Sistine Chapel Tour_AIE

There was a piece on the Pope’s Choir on 60 Minutes recently so this is very timely.

Enjoy the contemplative sounds and 3-D interactive tour of the Sistine Chapel Mural for your holidays.

If your winter weather is too cold this holiday to venture outdoors, enjoy these 16 surreal landscapes that could be too beautiful to be real.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Summer Schedule

Hello readers, with the summer schedule and needing to put forth extra energy and effort to my main CasartCoverings.com website and migrating the Slipcovers for your walls blog to an updated version, the posts on this blog will move to a temporary and limited, twice-a-month schedule.

Thank you for your continued interest as art oriented observations will still be posted, just not as frequently, like this little video-ditty about the singer Miquel’s creative process, on NPR’s Noteworthy series.

NPR_creative process film_AIE

I’ve listened to but not all that familiar with Miguel’s music and only like some of it, particularly the rhythm and blues, funk and more psychedelic-soul / lounge oriented pieces, but his thought process regarding creating music and how the artist is affected is surprisingly very thoughtful. I enjoyed learning more about him and his music as he discusses the inspiration for his latest music and video. He states the importance of being in the moment to absorb those bits of creative sparks that are so quickly fleeting. He recalls his time on the beach in letting those moments flow. I’ll be thinking of this as vacation to the beach is quickly coming and I don’t want to bring too much work this time. Click the image below to view.

Personally, I like his custom wallpaper 😉

Miguel wallpaper_AIE

Go ahead and subscribe (sidebar link) to this blog so you won’t miss out and won’t have to remember to check back. This way the posts will come to your inbox.

Hope you enjoy the rest of the summer and finding art is everywhere.

A Month of Celebrations

This has been quite a month of celebrations, so much so that I haven’t had a lot of time to document but here it goes — in bullet formation.

January – a Birthday is always great when it happens to land on a long holiday weekend, as my husband’s does with Martin Luther King Day. We took advantage when taking our son back to UVA for his final semester. We had recently discovered a new place, where we’ll be staying in May, and decided to test it out by staying over a night before heading back to DC. What a great decision! Shenandoah Crossing, in Gordonsville is a part of the BlueGreen Resorts and lives up to its promise of high style glamping. Although we stayed in the lodge during this cold, winter visit, we’ll be staying in a yurt and a 3-bedroom cabin with extended family later this spring.

BlueGreen Shenandoah Crossing Lodge_Art Is Everywhere

Shenandoah Crossing Lodge

Shenandoah Crossing room decor_Art Is Everywhere

Clever way to display framed pictures in the room

Shenandoah Crossing Lodge Restaurant_Art Is Everywhere

The Lodge Restaurant

Shenandoah Crossing Yurt_Art Is Everywhere

Shenandoah Crossing Yurt

February – Valentine’s Day is one that we don’t usually celebrate but this time it fell on a Sunday and luckily Monday was a holiday — Presidents’ Day. Yippie, we could actually enjoy the Wine Bars with the wine pairing I had planned in advance because this day didn’t fall on a work / week day or break our vow to give up drinking during Lent, which we sacrifice — except for the weekends.

I had picked up the Wine Bars from Fleurir and what a wonderful pairing it was. I never knew chocolate could make wine taste so much better and vise versa. I’ve already given these as a first year anniversary present to my son and his wife as well as good friend who shares the same birth month, but I had never tried them myself.

Fleurir Wine Bars_Art Is Everywhere

Fleurir Wine Bars – photo by Hannah Hudson

The only problem to the way the evening ended was pretty humorous, actually. Peter normally cooks melt-in-your-mouth steaks. For some reason, the ones we got from Whole Foods maybe had more fat than normal? Not sure but when flash pan-frying, they created so much smoke that the fire alarm went off. It wouldn’t have been a problem normally but since we’ve “upgraded” to a digital phone service, the alarm folks couldn’t get through the home phone to reach us as the alarm had hijacked the phone system with blasted warnings, “FIRE ALARM, leave the premises immediately!!” Well, the fire truck made it to our house before we could alert ADT to stop them — can only go through their 1-800 number. OK, as if this wasn’t embarrassing enough on a street with close-knit neighbors. The fire alarm went off again and guess what, yep, the fire truck paid us another visit. Crap! Lesson learned, we changed the phone alert pathway and at least we didn’t get charged. At this point, more wine and chocolate pairing was the best plan.

February – a Birthday is always great when it starts with a Friday. Actually my celebration started a few days before, on Wednesday, when we went to listen to Big Sam’s Funk Nation at Gypsy Sally’s. What fun!! I always get excited when I see bands from my hometown playing. This big brass New Orleans band with the lead singer, Big Sam Williams, gives a jiving, “urban funk” performance that just gets you up off your feet. He’s the former trombonist for the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. The 8 Ohms Band started the set and gave a great foot-stomping performance and certainly prepped the crowd for Big Sam, who came out and played a song before intermission.

8 Ohms Band_Art Is Everywhere

8 Ohms Band

8 Ohms 2_Art Is Everywhere 8 Ohms 3_Art Is Everywhere

Sams Big Funk Nation_Art Is EverywhereOn Friday, my real birthday, my good friend Liza had these gorgeous flowers delivered. My other good girlfriend, Marty, delivered her famous individual size coffee cake. Soooo nice! Sometimes, I get so busy, I forget my birthday. This wasn’t a big year and still people remembered.

Beautiful Birthday Flowers_Art Is Everywhere

These look so lovely with the portrait that was retrieved from my Aunt Katherine’s painting stash.

Relatives sent cards and my wonderful in-laws really surprised me with with beautiful vintage style, mother-of-pearl handle, double-blade, Congress Muskrat, pocket knife from A.G. Russell. There will be all sorts of uses for this beyond what I might know. I just have to remember to remove it before traveling on a plane.

A.G. Russell Pocket Knife_Art Is EverywhereWe topped off the evening with a fun night of pool at No. 9 Lounge (above the Majestic Lounge) at Evening Star Cafe. This is a somewhat hidden spot upstairs for pool, beer, meeting new pool buddies, listening to cool tunes and eating scrumptious food. I loved my cream of cauliflower soup with raisins. I need to get that recipe!

No 9 Lounge Evening Star Cafe_Art Is Everywhere

Unfortunately I couldn’t find a recent picture with the pool table in the far back (via Biz Bash)

Afterwards, we saw 13 Hours at the movie theater, which we rarely do these days but this is big screen worthy, as is The Revenant, The Martian and the latest Star Wars, all of which we’ve bucked up to see on the big screen. The movie tempered the mood but was well worth seeing. In fact, if everyone saw it, they would certainly question those publicly conveyed chain of events and the government’s role in them. Makes you think, if only….!

A Leap Year Anniversary — that comes every 4 years, gives us two times to celebrate in one year. This is our 7th special anniversary and we celebrated it at Magnolia’s On King, a relatively new Southern style restaurant that gets it right. We started out with the appetizers I love to have each time I’ve gone, stuffed dates with blue cheese and wrapped with bacon. Mouth-watering good! I’m using for our Easter Brunch! I had the best meal. Evidently, we lucked out because our celebratory night was on Monday — Gumbo Night. Wow! Excellent! A larger meal than Peter’s and just the right amount of spice.

Magnolias Stuffed Dates_Art Is EverywhereThe best part was heading upstairs to the Palm Lounge. It reminds me so much of New Orleans with the exposed brick wall, deep red walls brightened by firelight and rattan ceiling fans that I’ll go back to see in action when it gets warmer out. Tyler, the welcoming and talented bearded bartender, was willing to create a drink of our choice as long as he had the base to work with. We asked him about amaros and he said he was really liking Caramaro right now. Well, it’s one of my favorites so I asked him to please make a drink with it. This is the divine delicacy that he crafted with 1/2 oz gin (that I normally don’t drink), topped with egg white (Ramos Gin Fizz style) and a spritz of Angostura bitters.

Specially concocted Cardamarro Sour at Magnolia's_Art Is Everywhere

Specially concocted Cardamaro Sour at Magnolia’s

I can’t think of a better way to end the month, except, we may continue the celebration. We learned from our friendly bartender about Captain Gregory’s, a new (but not so) secret speakeasy to try, “a hole in the wall” inside the Sugar Shack Doughnut (hole) Shop, of all places. Looking forward to continuing new discoveries into March… 😉

Hint - Capture the Flag_Captain Gregory's_ Art Is Everywhere

Hint – Capture the Flag

A Carving Frenzy Yields Furry Animal Friends

This is a busy week so I’ll leave you with this incredible video of Lueb Popoff using a chainsaw, which at first appears to be a carving frenzy with no plan in sight. However, a beautiful sculpture eventually evolves with several furry animal friends that appear to magically “come out” of the woodwork.

How in the world does he do it?! Pretty fantastic.

I also like the music. Kinda the pace I’m keeping this week.

Prince George to the Kaos Temple and Beyond

With a new year comes a lot of new stories to follow, so this is a mish-mash of news.

  1. Seeing adorable Prince George attend his first day of school at the Westacre Montessori School in Norfolk, England, I couldn’t help but notice the lovely and prominent mural on the facade of the building. I was also impressed that the Duchess of Cambridge or Kate, his mother, took the photos of George. They are just as good if not better than what a professional photographer could capture.
Prince George attends school 1

via backstage24.gr

Prince George attends school 2_

via E Online. Photos by Duchess of Cambridge

Westacre Montessori School Mural

Westacre Montessori School and mural

If you want to see more photos, check out Prince Williams’ Family Album on E Online! You can scroll through the photos at the bottom of the screen.

2. An update on the Jefferson County Courthouse murals: the commission has decided to hire a consultant for $2,830 to determine if the murals can be removed to another location and the cost involved. It remains to be seen what will happen if they cannot or if it is cost prohibitive. One idea is to “drape over” the current murals until more updated ones can be painted. I imagine this would be costly as well.

3. Is winter already too cold for you? We’re just now getting some cold weather but nothing like they are in the Mid North West. Visualizing these intriguing Cherry Blossom murals will help you remember spring will be here before you know it and remind you that art can be created in many clever ways. These take the term “hand painted” to a new level.

okurie-cherryblossom-1

Cherry Blossom photos via Fubiz

Hand Painted Cherry Blossom photos via Fubiz 2These murals by muralist Yosuke Tan are painted with hand prints on the windows of an abandoned school in Japan. Upon first site they appear quite beautiful as the light streaming through the window makes the red hand prints brilliantly shine, however, when you realize where and how they are painted, they can also invoke a sense of uneasiness similar to the one I get when I envision those twin and ghost children and the “red room” reference in the Shining movie. Clever and a little creepy at the same time.

Hand Painted Cherry Blossom photos via Fubiz 3 Hand Painted Cherry Blossom photos via Fubiz 44. Finally, learning about the Kaos Temple on Yatzer really blew me away! Spanish artist Okuda San Miguel really transforms the former Santa Barbara church with his characteristic geometric style murals based on the Kaos star reference. kaos star via chaos grimoireYou just have to see the images on Yatzer to really understand how a church can come back to life not only as a skateboard palace but now affectionately known now as the Kaos [skate] temple where skateboarding and other miracles happen. Not surprisingly the origin of the word Chaos comes from Kaos, From Ancient Greek χάος (“vast chasm, void”), but in this case, I think a unique order has been implemented.

Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 1

Kaos Temple photos via Yatzer

Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 2 Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 3 Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 4 Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 5 Kaos Temple_yatzer_AIE 6Okuda San Miguel really takes his murals to church, so to speak, which brings a little more significance to this Take Me to Church song by Hozier.

You can read more about the artist’s background and design influence in his interview on Colossal.

Church Exterior via Colossal_AIE

Church Exterior via Colossal

Skate church via Colossal_AIE

Skate Church Interior

 

A Toussaint Tribute

How upsetting to learn that one of the musical greats, Allen Toussaint passed away suddenly on November 10th. He was stricken with a heart attack just hours after performing in Madrid with his son. He was 77 years young.

I’ve been wanting to see him live in concert for years. I love his music, especially the song, Yes We Can from the album Our New Orleans recorded with other iconic New Orleans musicians such as Irma Thomas, as a benefit album for the Gulf Coast. This CD got me through some rough, surreal days after Katrina.

Here’s Allen Toussaint performing Yes We Can with Dr. John at Tulane’s Commencement.

Deacon John Moore and Irma Thomas reflects on their memories of Toussaint.

There are so many songs you may know that you never knew were written by Allen Toussaint like: Southern Nights made famous by Glen Campbell , Working on a Coal Mine (even Devo did a cover of this), Sneaking Sally through the Alley and Lady Marmalade made famous by Patty LaBelle as her signature song. He played piano on Mother-in-Law earlier in his career with Ernie K-Doe. His song Whipped Cream was made famous by Al Hirt and Herb Albert and their trumpets (and later became known more wildly as the song for the popular Dating Game). He produced Dr. John’s breakout album Right Place, Wrong Time (1973). Many of his other songs were recorded by the Rolling Stones, Bonnie Raitt and Warren Zevon among others.

Allen Toussaint on Art is EverywhereAccording to his obit in the Washington Post, he began playing the piano at age 6 and played everyday in the style of Professor Longhair, who was a major influence.

After being born and living all his life in New Orleans, he was forced from his home for the first time during Katrina in 2005. He didn’t make it back until 2013.

Enjoy the official Toussaint website for some Toussaint Tribute and wonderful jazz music to just play in the background. The site hasn’t posted any updated news yet, probably because his death was so unexpected.

Allen Toussaint on Art is EverywhereEnjoy a little more…from this great musician who will be sadly missed. Fortunately, he’s left us so many songs to happily play.

Down by the Sea

While vacationing in the OBX what better way to celebrate life than posting about a recent discovery about Google’s Ocean Project and in the process finding this Men at Work song that I hadn’t heard before — jazzy and reflective of the beach’s beauty and beyond.

Down by the sea
I found your hidden treasure
Just you and me,
We overdosed on pleasure…

Imagine searching for directions to somewhere on Google Maps and looking at the street view so you’ll know what your destination will look like in real-time as you drive to it. Google’s Ocean Project gives you this street view in the ocean — under the water. They are mapping the world’s oceans and I can’t think of anything more other-worldly, right here on earth and without having to travel far to find. Truly fascinating!

When you go to the site, click on any map marker in the bottom left and it will take you to a 3-D panoramic view of that underwater spot. You can click on any thumbnail picture view and go there as well.

Google Ocean project_2 on Art Is Everywhere

Google Ocean project_1 on Art Is Everywhere

Have fun searching and discovering a whole other word that most of us will rarely see in person. Here’s a magical spot in the Florida Keys, where I hope to visit someday in person.

Florida Keys_Google Project_Art Is EverywhereIn the meantime, I’m enjoying this Australian sea-side video set to Down By the Sea and the ocean at Ocracokein real-time. Just hope not to see any sharks this trip.

…Down by the sea
I found your hidden treasure
Just you and me
We over-dosed on pleasure

Listen to your heart
Screamin’ at the sky
Can’t you feel it tremble?
Don’t you wonder why?

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