Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Little Daily Treasures

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

I am so pleased that Karen Winters agreed to let me post some of  her prolific paintings here to show how beautiful daily artwork can be. Thank you, Karen.

Karen creates a miniature oil painting a day, similar Daily Creative concept mentioned in my previous post, as can be seen on her Creative Journey blog. Her works below range in size but are roughly 6 x 6″ to 11 x 14″. Hope you enjoy these daily treasures as much as I do. She lives in a gorgeous, sunny California location and fortunately for us she has the talent for capturing its beauty on canvas.

Gaviota Springtime by Karen Winters, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Gaviota Springtime by Karen Winters. Presently in an historic centennial museum show at the Pasadena Museum of California Art with the California Art Club

when-sunrise-fills-the-sky-SLO-art-painting-m, seen on Art Is Everywhere

When Sunrise Fills the Sky

3_malibu-pink-clouds by Karen Winters, seen on Art is Everywhere

Malibu Pink Clouds

back-bay-sunset-square by Karen Winters, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Back Bay Sunset

big-sur-beauty-seascape by Karen Winters, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Big Sur Beauty Seascape

Heaven-at-devils-gate-dam-La-Canada by Karen Winters, on Art Is Everwhere

Heaven at Devils Gate Dam

sierra-daybreak by Karen Winters as seen on Art Is Everywhere blog

Sierra Daybreak

Here’s a sense of her easel set up, all the gear an artist needs to have on hand, not making it easy to paint outside — especially when an unexpected breeze might pick up and scatter you wares to the wind.

Karen Winter's au plean air easel, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Karen Winter's au plein air easel set up

Karen Winter's Easel set up at Burtt Ranch, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Karen Winter's Easel set up at Burtt Ranch

Karen’s depiction of white cactus flowers below in Come Hither is just stunning. Their sense of glowing light just beckons you to come closer.

Come Hither by Karen Winters, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Come Hither (white cactus flowers). 16 x 20 oil by Karen Winters

I find it intriguing that prior to her art career, she was involved in the very corporate world of media/ entertainment as and Emmy award winning producer, writer for ABC’s 20/20, as well as sales and marketing programs for businesses and advertising agencies. Just goes to show you that your second career can be just as successful and rewarding and maybe even more so than the first.

Speaking of second comings and starting over, Happy Easter everyone!

I’ve never seen this video before and I’m not quite sure what to make of Sting’s humoristic (?) portrayal as the Messiah, which I think it is supposed to be but since I like the song Brand New Day and his video theme works in a timely way for Easter, here it goes for Kick Starting the Weekend:

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The Cherry Blossoms are Here!

Monday, March 28th, 2011

The cherry blossoms just burst into bloom on my street. They are gorgeous! They are just in time for DC’s annual Cherry Blossom Festival. This year, there is a special tribute to Japan in light of their recent earthquake, tsunami and nuclear power situation. It’s so overwhelming the amount of damage and help needed; it’s hard to know where to start. There are plenty of charitable giving opportunities out there but recent events in Japan makes this year’s cherry blossoms all the more celebrated. *

I have so many mural sites collected but a cherry blossom mural was hard to come by except by searching. Only then, did I come across Sculpture SenCe’s site and Santi Vipaka’s wonderful artwork. You’ll have to go to his site to see more but here’s his Cherry Blossom Mural.

Sculpture_SenCe_Mural on Art-Is-Everywhere

Cherry Blossom Mural by Sculpture SenCe and Santi Vipaka

Here’s another Asian inspired mural in Toronto’s Rosewater  Supper Club restaurant.

Supper Club_mural in Toronto, seen on Art Is Everywhere

I seem to get inspired every time I see the cherry blossoms bloom and these are my many postings regarding this time of year. The blooms are fleeting and only last 12 – 14 days and that is weather conditional. This weekend, we had a dusting of snow. Hopefully this will help them last longer.

* When I posted this mural from Osaka on March 7th, the Japanese tsunami was just about ready to happen on March 12th. Call it coincidental but I find it a little uncanny.

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Painting Winter Woods

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

If you’re stuck inside, with all this winter snow, this step-by-step process of how to paint snow in the winter woods is a great instructional exercise to pass the time using pastel painting with watercolors. I’ve never used the two together and this was highly informative — particularly for achieving that translucent hue of snow. How do you paint white with color? It’s perplexing but Christine Kane on Art Instruction Blog makes it look easy. See how she goes from this reference photo to her final painting.

ChristineKane_deep_snow1b on Art Is Everywhere

Christine Kane Reference Photos via Art Blog Instruction

Christine_Kane_snow-underdrawing on Art Is Everywhere

Christine Kane snow underdrawing

Christine_Kane_final_snow-painting on Art is Everywhere

Christine Kane final snow painting

One Tree Hill by U2 seems a good way to Kick Start the weekend early and in hopes that 2011 gets off to a good start.

Here’s something to start off your new year — an announcement from the Colorado Creative Industries for artists to submit ideas for a public art project for the new Ralph L. Carr Colorado Judicial Center in Denver, Colorado. The budget is 1.6 million and the deadline is January 20, 2011. Click this link to get more info and to get started brainstorming.

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Examples of Exotic

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

Normally I find music to go along with my posts for the end of the week. This time, I re-discovered the music before the artwork through my son’s Facebook thread, who knew…..

I just ran across this song, Kiss Them for Me by Siouxi and the Banshees. I loved in the 80′s and that still hasn’t changed. I forgot what a fun song this was, especially to Kick Start the weekend.

Now for the artwork, again, just happened to see this Ford ad. Grabs your attention right?! And it happens to be the perfect lips for Kiss them for me. What I also like about it is the use of textural art, instead of forming the picture as in previous examples, here the words overlay on top of the image — great Photoshop and clever idea.

Kiss_Ford-ad_as seen on Art Is Everywhere

I’ll also add some exotic artwork — or what I think may be — by Katherine Bowling, from an article I read in Elle Decor. Her paintings do not depict the usual composed perspective. They appear off-center and focus on the mundane, every day aspect of the scene. They seem to evoke a mysterious, exotic, fantasy-feel of images of familiarity. I also appreciate their liquid painterly style as if realism is obscurely viewed through glass. She captures the detail yet glazes over it. The lighting in her work reminds me of the sensuality one might feel while experiencing just the perfect outdoor scene, when everything falls into place as being serene and memorable above all other similar days. This is like when you notice that sunset, that you know occurs every evening but you’ve never quite seen it so beautiful before.

Katherine-Bowling_via Elle Decor, October 2010 issue, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Article on Katherine Bowling featured in Elle Decor, October 2010 issue

Finally, since I started with how I found my music for this post, I’ll end with with a link to a post about my son Jackson’s artwork by Taylor Kavanaugh, a classmate who graduated with Jackson from high school. I had not seen this photo below and agree with her take on Jackson’s keen photographic eye. Somehow he’s able to capture what we might all take for granted and present it in a intriguing and mysterious way. I wonder where this structure is in the vast Sewanee woods?

Jackson's+photo via Taylor's Art Blog, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Jackson's photo via Taylor's Art Blog

Hopefully, you’ve been listening to the song above, all while reading this post. If not, get to it and start kick-starting your weekend early. It’s almost Friday.

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Designer Show House for the Richmond Symphony Orchestra

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

Rothesay, the Richmond Symphony Orchestra League’s Designer Show House, is well worth the trip. My husband and I took a four hour round trip  road trip to Richmond on a crisp, fall-like Sunday to view Mary Douglas Drysdale’s room in the RSOL Designer Show House. We arrived early to meet Mary there so we could take some pictures.  Getting there before it opened to the public, allowed us to meet the day crew captain and volunteer staff and help them by turning on all of the lights in all of the rooms. There were so many rooms, that I lost count. You could tell it’s an older house, come to life with all the renovated interior design, partly because of the “old school” punch light switches. Georgie, the caged finch in the Morning Hall, which was designed by Karen Farrow and Jonathan Williams, was chirping away, happy to be greeting people. There was some necessary vacuuming and then before we knew it the house was abuzz with visitors.

RSO_Rothesay-back_0046_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Back view of Rothesay. Photos by C. Ashley Spencer

We still had time to take a few preliminary angle shots for Mary in anticipation of the photo shoot next weekend.

1RSO-MDD_0024_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Photos of Mary Douglas Drysdale’s Living Room Design at Rothesay

2RSO_MDD_0028_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

3RSO_MDD_0025_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

When Mary arrived, she went right to work explaining her room to a group of visitors. She reiterated what she had explained to us that her objective in the room was to combine traditional elements with modern, all in a balanced, sustainable room. The geometric floor pattern that Mary designed is contemporary but repeats the hexagonal shape found on the 18th century American piece and the stenciled bell flower harkens to a well known folk-life motif.

9RSO_MDD_0052_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Geometric pattern in the floor repeats the pattern in 18th century piece

The carved Great Dane above the fireplace by Mark Perry, a well known folk-life artist, was carved just for this space. Its stark dark contrast compared with the subtle decorative finish of the cream walls lends a modern feel.

4RSO_MDD_0051_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

The two large portrait photographs by Max Hirshfield, purposely captured in one shot, serve as bold injections of color as well as unusual pairings with traditional, Cuban, folk-like furniture. These photos have an uncanny look of hyper realistic paintings.

7RSO_MDD_056_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls8RSO_MDD_0057_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

Mary carries the subtle geometric patterning into the stenciling below the crown molding and with patterning on the drapes. The textiles for the furniture and curtains are made of the softest alpaca and linen and striking side tables are made from reclaimed river wood, all proving sustainability can be beautiful.

5RSO_MDD_0026_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

Mary is a master of proportion and balance. What I like about her work is it unveils itself like a well written story with subtle yet sublime reflections that reveal themselves through discovery; however, she has thought of them all in advance. Like a true spatial architect she works with the foundation and presents the details with significance.

6RSO_MDD_0030_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

We were able to grab a coffee, talk with more volunteers about where to go afterwards (that pleasant and gracious Southern hospitality just comes naturally in Richmond) and then we took in the spectacular grounds with the beautiful vista of the James River. I had a little time to do a quick 5 min sketch.

Rothesay_Bridge_0043_casartblog on Slipcovers for you wals
Rothesay grounds looking over the James River & Bridge
Rothesay_JamesRiver_0045_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Rothesay. Overlooking the James River.
Rothesay_JamesRiverSketch_CAS_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Quick sketch of James River Vista
Rothesay_Terrace_0048_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Terrace — drawing spot

Rothesay_Fountain_0047_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

Fortunately, we also had a chance to see the informative movie that the RSOL had produced about the history or Rothesay leading up to the present owners, George and Anne Anderson. Rothesay is an 8 acre estate built in the grand English Tudor tradition. However, the original house looked quite different, complete with a large tower at the entrance. It was built by Jonathan Bryan in 1913, brother of  John Stewart Bryan a newspaper publisher, and named for their grandfather’s hometown in the Isle of Bute in Scotland. Family friend, Charles Gillette, a well known landscape architect completed the landscape design. After his brother’s death in 1933, John Stewart Bryan sold the house to Edward and Isabel Anderson. Isabel, herself an accomplished pianist, was also one of the founding members and patrons of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra, so it is very fitting that her house is a part of this designer tradition today for the RSOL. It is her son, George and his English born wife, Anne, who presently hold ownership of the house and their daughter, Randy Trainor, coincidentally enough, is the interior designer who’s work is in the library. Music evidently was constant while growing up through generations in the house.

RSO_Library_0036_csartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Study and colored books by Blaise Adams & David Barden

Here are few more pictures of some of the other designers’ marvelous rooms. There are 32 interior designers, 28 interior spaces, 12 landscape designers for 14 exterior vignettes. Every one of them had a different feel, which makes this Show House so interesting. Go quickly, it closes after next weekend, on October 11th.

RSO_Tobie Fairley_EntryHall_0029_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Tobie Fairley’s Entrance Hall

RSO_Fairley_EntryHall_0031_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

RSO_Stoner_DiningRm_0035_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Jennifer Stoner’s Dining Room

The designers’ inspiration in the sunroom below was to highlight the fretwork to make  the room feel as if one was inside a Chines Porcelain jar.

RSO_Malone-Morgan_Sunroom_John-Magor_photo_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Sunroom by Kevin Malone & Kathy Morgan. Photography by John Magor
RSO_Malone-Morgan_Sunroom_0042_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Sunroom (with little sun). Photo by C. Ashle Spencer

I couldn’t help but get a kick out of the David [Hick's] & Kelly [Wearstler's] imagined romance spaces for the loft by Kat and Mike Liebschwager. I actually was drawn to the Kelly room before I knew the significance. How clever.

RSO_UpstairsAlcove_0039_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls
Imaginary romance loft space by Kat & Mike Liebschwager

The bamboo upon leaving also struck me as enchanted.
Rothesay_Bamboo_casartblog on Slipcovers for your walls

Richmond is a perfect spot to take in some fall color and while there, I’d recommend the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and dining at the Water Grill, where we lucked out in finding it in Carytown and had a delicious and reasonably priced meal. A wonderful way to top of a great adventure.

Water Grill  on Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog

WaterGrill on Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog

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Sequoia

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Sequoia has many meanings. It mostly calls to mind the beautiful Redwood Trees in sunny California, the state from which my husband and oldest son just returned. This is also the tree that my father-in-law has growing in his front yard. Needless to say, it is the largest tree on the street, if not in the beach area and may soon be the largest (because it’s still growing), if not only Sequoia, in Rhode Island.

sequoia-11 image via  http://sciencelog.edublogs.org/plants/, Art is Everywhere blog

sequoia tree image via http://sciencelog.edublogs.org/plants/

I wonder if his will get big enough to drive a car through? Visiting the Redwoods in Yosemite as a child, I always thought this ability was pretty remarkable.

sequoia image via http://newton.kias.re.kr/~choe/yosemite.html, on Art Is Everywhere

mage via http://newton.kias.re.kr/~choe/yosemite.html

The [USS] Sequoia is also the name of the the Presidential Yacht — until it was sold to a private owner and then repurchased by the US Government to be used for event rentals — when not being used by The President and his family. A little side note:  the private owner of this glamorous yacht purchased an auction item to use my illustration services nearly 25 years ago. We coordinated but unfortunately, he never used it.

USS Sequoia via People. Photo by Pablo Martinez Monsivais, on Art Is Everywhere blog

USS Sequoia via People. Photo by Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Even though these meanings have some personal significance to me, the first thing I think of is Sequoia restaurant located at the Georgetown’s Waterfront. This is where Peter and I like to go on glorious days like this recent weekend, where we sat out on the multi-tiered patio with our beers and relaxing with a pot of jumbo shrimp to peel and eat. It was sunny, about 80 degrees tops with a nice beach-like breeze. Perfect. Many others were doing the same thing, including the wedding party that had rented out the interior just so we could enjoy fun 80′s music. How nice of them. By the way, you can enjoy music by Fred Astaire and Dean Martin and others through their website.

Sequoia-waterfront_ArtIsEverywhere

The Waterfront via Sequoia Restaurant

Sequoia Restaurant -interior_Art Is Everywhere blog

The Interior of Sequoia via Sequoia Restaurant

This table, right in front of the column is where we celebrated Piers’ 18th birthday for an early dinner four years ago.

I’ve been saving this ad for Sequoia because I love the blue butterflies that they have added. They are gorgeous and maybe that is because I am partial to blue butterflies.

Sequoia Ad_Art Is Everywhere blog

The harbor is truly magical at night. Here’s a quick sketch that I did near this location from the patio (Mezz bar) on the left but looking in the other direction — opposite of the Kennedy Center and across the Potomac toward Rosslyn. It was late afternoon, so hopefully you can see the boats because there were many kayakers and boaters on the Potomac and others pulling up to dock. Maybe they were coming up for happy hour like we were. How often can you celebrate a gorgeous day like this?

Sketch of Sequoia's Mezz Patio Bar by C. Ashley Spencer, Art Is Everywhere

Sketch of Sequoia's Mezz Patio Bar by C. Ashley Spencer

Because we are attending an event tonight, Supper Under The Stars,  in our own neighborhood at The King Street Gardens Park (the second post that started my blog and the organization from which I recently “retired” after 7 years of affiliation, even though I’ll still be involved), I think some tropical music is in order to Kick-Start the Weekend. But first a little smooth jazz to get it started, from Al Williams, tonight’s performer.

Supper Under the Stars_via OTBA, on Art Is Everywhere blog

And then let’s kick it up a notch with Tropicallia by Beck:


Beck – Tropicalia
Uploaded by mellow1_nate2. – Watch more music videos, in HD!

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Rice Field Follow Up

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

I’ve written about the artistic rice paddy fields in Japan before but this video explains the creative and engineering process of getting the images to sprout in the rice fields. What an innovative idea that not only brings this village community together by involving them in the process but brings tourism to their town.

Rice Paddy Art. Watch more top selected videos about: The Early Show (video disabled by CBS)
rice-paddy-art-design-layout. Photo via Let's Japan, seen on Art Is Everywhere

Rice Paddy Art & Design Layout. Courtesy Lets Japan.com

This is even more interesting to me now that my son Jackson has returned from Sewanee’s summer school and it’s official, he will be attending The University of the South in the fall. (I know, it’s kinda late in the game as his parents to know this but we’ve had a lot of practice at challenges with a teenager by now. It’s nice to see that now that he’s 18, he’s finally outgrowing the teenage angst. Fingers crossed.) He exceeded the minimal, pass requirement by making an A in Math and B+ in English, both with professors who my husband and I had when we attended Sewanee. Now he’s got one semester worth of credits for these subjects under his belt and he’ll be ahead starting the new year. This will be an interesting and somewhat surreal experience for us all, for Sewanee is not the same since we were there, and I wouldn’t expect it to be. For instance, we used to have to take five credits per semester, now students take four.  They now have common interest “communities” where students with similar interests are housed in one dorm location. Jackson informs us that he wants to take Japanese as his foreign language (not offered when we were there) with the hopes of even studying abroad in Japan. Maybe we’ll get to see these fields afterall.

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Digital Mural Restoration

Monday, July 26th, 2010

I found this mention of the conservation of these Renaissance murals  at the Brömserhof Museum in Ruedesheim, Germany, just fascinating. It seems such a practical idea to use the scanning of original photos of these murals with some Photoshop or Illustrator technology (looks like) to enable the necessary steps to replication and repair. Kudos! It makes perfect sense to use digital technology for mural restoration. What a fabulous restoration project to be working on…

Digital Restoration for German Murals, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Traditional Restoration uses new technology for German Murals

Another inspirational mural mention that I discovered this week, is Corinne Ulman’s golden leaf mural, on the Griffin Court Condominium, at 800 10th Avenue on the corner of West 53rd Street, Manhattan. It is just gorgeous. I love these colors, as I get lots of inspiration from Nature.

Leaf Mural. Photo by Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Leaf Leaf Mural. Photo by Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times

I had been hired recently to replicate fall leaf colors in a decorative finish for a client. The oranges and yellow combos I did were bold and bright (represented in a previous client’s work below). It was difficult to introduce the red without obliterating the other colorwashes, however, and without actually painting something figurative, such as leaves. Here’s an example of a wall finish that I did for a client with red and metallic highlights, inspired by fall colors and another one with a suede-like beige with gold flecks. It was soft and reminded me of feathers. Lots of inspiration comes from leaves, Nature and fall colors.

casart_bold-orange-colorwash_Art-Is-Everywhere_blog

Bold Pumpkin Colorwash

casart_Colorwash-Metallic_ArtIsEverywhere_blog

Bold Reddish Colorwash with Bronze Metallic Highlights

Beige Colorwash with Gold Metallic Flecks, Art Is Everywhere blog

Beige Colorwash with Gold Metallic Flecks

I just found this clipping from my “ideabook” of all sorts of visuals to show clients. This helps narrow the field for potential finishes, etc. This would be a perfect solution to incorporate the yellow, orange and red colors of the maple leaves mural above in a decorative colorwash finish. It came from a storage drawer ad in a magazine. You never know where artists are going to find inspiration….

Multiple colorwash coats_Art Is Everywhere

Multiple colorwashes

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The Marriage of Two Posts for Gulf Coast Aid

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

This is where two posts meet. I could have easily found a quick mention for Friday and included my weekly Kick Start your Weekend music but I’m dealing with a conundrum and in also trying to find something to write for my other weekly blog post, Slipcovers for your Walls, I realized as I was searching for this one, that in thinking through this creative process, I found the answer to both. I’ve already posted this on the casartblog but here it is with more thought process.

I keep  list of topics to write on and my favorite always comes back to the creative process. It is how artwork begins and how it evolves. There are hoards of information on this topic but I always find inspiration in unlikely places: from the creative innovation of the Old Spice commercials that I just blogged on; to research for finding visual inspiration; to explanations regarding how to give good critical analysis; to the visual humor describing the interactions between artist and client (I’ve had some of these types of moments); to some brilliance and clarity in a web enthusiast’s and an electrical-engineer graduate’s take on The Art of Design and Creative Thinking, just among many. I believe the analytical process of design is similar if not the same as creating artwork. Artwork may not always have function whereas design might. If you click my Design category (on the right), you’ll see plenty of examples that involve art. Richie Thimmaiah of Richworks above states, “Design is Everywhere.” Well, I can’t help but agree and also in that Art is Everywhere.

Here’s my conundrum (not only trying to figure out what to write) but the value — the artistic merit and importance of some latest designs / artwork that I’m working on for Casart coverings. We posted a while ago on the Slipcovers for your Walls blog about our efforts to help the Gulf Coast recovery. It’s an issue that is very personal to me and I’m passionate about wanting to do something.  As Louisiana Governor, Bobby Jindal, states so truthfully in his editorial, this area needs some help. It’s still reeling from Katrina and now this?!

As an artist, I think about art to help in the response, so I have created a Gulf Coast Mural and designs where proceeds will go to two selected organizations that are at the forefront, helping in this effort. I helped this way for Katrina and other artists that I have posted on, have done the same. But what do you do when you start to question whether or not it makes sense to do. Will people like it? How will they use it? Will they purchase it? Will they even understand it? I have some valid answers that I think apply to all of these but I know I am too close to decide.

There are some valid points from the links above to consider and some quotes I’ll pull:

I like to say, to find inspiration, one should take a look around. What is surrounding you?” — Rebecca Reilering (Research to Feed Your Visual Mind)

“...destroying your designer’s artistic confidence by tearing down a design without acknowledging any positive points, is usually not good policy…One reality that I feel escapes many clients who hire graphic designers is that while this is a form of commercial art, the process is still art. The creative process is still emotional, inspirational and can be very personal, so it’s important to acknowledge…” — Fuschia Mac

” I’ve looped my mother in the conversation…she has a good eye for design….The design you put together needs some brighter colors…perhaps a little pink? Throw in a kitten or two. Everybody loves kittens!…All hope is lost…You are no longer a [web] designer.”Oatmeal (How a Web Design Goes to Hell)

“Success without taking risks is impossible. Mistakes are a part and parcel in the process of achieving extraordinary results. A good designer is not taken apart by such mistakes, rather he learns from itSome people embrace it and others don’t. If you want to to survive in a world which is changing rapidly as we speak, I suggest you listen closely to the former kind and try your best avoiding the latter.”Richworks (The Art of Design/Creative Thinking)

And a quote he pulled for his blog that I found really thought provoking:

“Talent hits the target no one else can hit; genius hits the target no one else can see” — Arthur Shoepenhauer

OK, so now I know why some artists, myself included at times, feel a little crazy and that part may explain the stereotype. Can you have talent and genius together? I would say yes, I hope so.

Here’s a glimpse at the latest work. I’ve posted a blog poll to get feedback and of course you can always comment with more specifics but I’d like to know your thoughts. The concept here is to offer an interactive mural — a way for the customer to design their own mural (from these already painted creations). This is an example. The hard part is how to explain this on a website where we don’t have the technology to create something with code to drop and drag in the images. I wish we did.

casart_Gulf-Coast_Mural_ArtisEverywhere_casartblog

This mural can be created in any configuration with these separate panels

Here’s an example of one of the individual panels with wording. They will also be offered without wording in a white or water background.

casart_Pelican_wWords2_blog

Casart Pelican for Gulf Coast recovery



Since you can’t bring your wall artwork with you to show others in public, what about wearing your mural, or parts of it? I came up with a new Crawfish Cotillion design made with the crawfish that I painted. So, I thought, why not make it into a weekender or beach bag that you can hopefully use on the Gulf Coast beaches? Here are some preliminary designs for this concept, showing two ways to offer the crawfish design + we’ll have this in many colors. Cross over the the Casartblog to vote on your favorite patterns, after you vote here.

Casart-coverings_BagConcept2_blog

Weekender Bag concept with Crawfish Cotillion Design

Casart-coverings_BagConcept1_blog, ArtisEverywhere

Casart coverings Beach bag concept with a mural element


Many thanks for your input and in keeping with tradition, here’s some appropriate music to Kick Start your Weekend, and one of my very favorites for New Orleans’ music, “Yes We Can” by Allen Toussaint, accompanied by Elvis Costello:

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Gnarly Art

Friday, July 16th, 2010

I like most any kind of art that is truly innovative, so I was intrigued when I read the article about Seth Goldstein and Paula Stone, a husband and wife “weed warrior” team, as they call themselves. They scavenge the woods looking for gnarly vines and branches that they collect to compose one of a kind, organic sculptures. They mostly collect bittersweet because it is extremely invasive for trees. Being retired engineers, who happened to meet while swing dancing, they know how the twists and turns of putting these things together. In doing so, they appear to be helping save trees in the process.

Seth Golstein_PhotoAlexandra Garcia, WP, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Seth Goldstein. Photo by Alexandra Garcia, WP

Vine Artists. Photo by Alexandra Garcia, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Vine Artists. Photo by Alexandra Garcia, WP

Omar vine sculpture, WP, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Omar, the camel, vine sculpture. Courtesy Washington Post

Here’s a fun video link that describes their process. In looking to see if they had a website, I came across this interesting link about them and other Foggy Bottom artists and the Outdoor Sculpture exhibit. I didn’t even know it was taking place. Also, here’s a previous post on Twig and Tree Art.

All of this makes me think of Gnarls Barkley and his song, Crazy to Kick Start the weekend. Maybe it’s just his name. Click the picture to see the video and this clever take on the Rorschach’s inkblot test. You can even take it online to determine if you’re crazy or not. :)

Gnarls Barkley Crazy, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Gnarls Barkley, Crazy

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