Healing through Art

Just a reminder that the health and healing can come from the power of art.

healing-painting on Art Is Everywhere

via US News

You can read the informative article The Power of Creative Arts in Health and Healing by Ronit Fallek by clicking the link.

Keeping this in mind, The blog will be taking a sick-leave break until October while I recover from a bad sinus / ear infection / chest cold and hope it doesn’t progress into bronchitis, the usual next phase for me. I haven’t been ill in long time but I’ve already bounced back faster this time by not taking antibiotics while building up my own immunity.

All this is occurring during a planned marketing campaign that has been delayed but now now set back on track, so scoot over to Slipcovers for Your Walls for when it posts.

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A Thermodynamic Mural View

This post is just in time for some summer July heat, especially just after celebrating a Fourth of July holiday weekend.

As featured on Creativity, Lennox, the air conditioning/ cooling and heating company, has partnered with 5 street artists for them to paint L.A. murals using thermodynamic / thermochromic paint. The paint changes with the temperature while the murals morph into new images. There are basically 2 murals in one. Pretty spectacular!

This octopus mural named Adaptive by Bacon changes just like in real life.

It makes me think of one of my favorite books, The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery.

Adaptive Octopus thermochromic mural by Bacon_Art Is Everywhere

Click this link to read more and see the full video, which is really creative and well done.

Thermochomic paint video_via Creativity on Art Is Everywhere

via Creativity

Here are the other Degrees of Perfect video teasers for reference.

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Fabulous Fibonacci is Golden Art

I’ve just backed Rafael Araujo’s Kickstarter project to bring his beautiful architectural illustrations to light in an adult coloring book. Araujo is a Venezuelan architect in Caracas, who’s been using the Fibonacci Sequence or Golden Ratio for over 40 years to create his artwork.

Rafael Araujo at work_ Art Is Everywhere

Rafael Araujo at work

The Golden Ratio uses “Phyllotaxis,” which is the tendency in nature for things to grow in spiral patterns. This concept can be seen in mathematically sequenced spirals in seashells and butterflies — two of my favorite things — among many other elements that are found in Nature.

Golden Ratio shell 1_Art Is EverywhereHe’s left all the mathematical plotting points intact to show the diagram of the object he’s illustrating, similar to Leonardi’s famous image of the Vitruvian man, which in this case also shows how the circle and the Golden Ratio Rectangle come together.

Rafael Araujo_Golden Ratio Rectangle Fibonacci Spiral_ArtIsEverywhere

Leonardo Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man_ArtIsEverywhere

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man via Stanford University

Golden Ratio shell 3_ Art Is Everywhere

Araujo’s shells using the Golden Ratio

Golden Ratio shell 2_Art Is Everywhere

Rafael Araujo_Blue Morpho butterflies_ArtIsEverywhere

Blue Morpho Butterflies in flight by Rafael Araujo

Casart Butterfly Logo2_Art Is Everywhere

Casart coverings Blue Morpho Logo Butterfly

I love the Blue Morpho Butterfly, as you can see above. I took these next two pictures while in Panama. It is one of the most majestic creatures. I was so excited to see them in flight, as well as leaf cutter ants at work. Pretty amazing and mesmerizing.

Blue Morpho Underside wing pattern in Panama_Art Is Everywhere

Blue Morpho Underside wing pattern in Panama

Blurry Blue Morpho eating_AIE

Blurry Blue Morpho eating

Rafael Araujo_Monarch butterflies_ArtIsEverywhere

Araujo’s Monarch Butterflies

I’m loving this coloring book because it epitomizes the apex of where art and science come together. I’m excited to receive one but more importantly, I’m very happy, Mr. Araujo and his printers have already reached their fundraising goal. I’m just pleased to be a part of the effort to bring his exceptional art to others. You can still be a part of the effort too until April 27th, so get on board and surf the Golden Ratio wave!

Golden Ratio Coloring Book_ArtIsEverywhereHere are some more links that may be of interest:

Rafael Araujo’s website

His creative process on Imgur

Math is Fun – The Fibonacci Sequence

A Fun Math Exercise in Your Garden

About the Fibonacci Sequence

Golden Ratio in relation to Fibonacci Sequence

More on Golden Rectangles

Golden Ratio Rectangle_ArtIsEverywhere

Don’t ask me to explain the math, except maybe this is why I like Spirograph so much! 😉

 

A Big Magic Kahuna with Creative Content

There have been two books I’ve read recently that deserve big recognition for their ability to express the subtleties of man living in consort with Nature and the mystery of inspiration. It’s Elizabeth’s Gilbert’s Big Magic, Creative Living Beyond Fear that takes the prize, however, for boldly being able to give meaning to and explain the creative process and the pathways to choose for achieving the most positive results.

Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert_Art Is EverywhereShe begins her book with a simple question and answer, “What is creativity? [It is] the relationship between a human being and the mysteries of inspiration.” This blog, by the way, is primarily about witnessing such inspiration and marveling in the creative process involved.

Gilbert eloquently describes the moment that one’s revelation of an idea occurs is when a person is open to receive the thought that may have been there but they were not cognizant of seeing it. Kinda like the thought of the potential for art being everywhere exists around us but it takes the perceptive individual to notice. She likens an idea to a living entity that gets its life force through a person, as if the person is the vehicle for bringing it to light. If the person is unwilling to engage the idea, not receptive or too late to act on it, then the idea goes elsewhere looking for another individual to entice. She describes an example when her idea for a book was passed to another author simply through a hug. It was not the best timing for her to commit to the idea so the idea left for another host and this other author wrote a wonderful book involving this same idea. The idea was never discussed between the writers in advance. It only came to light when Ann Patchet (the other author) was describing her new book, State of Wonder. You might think Gilbert would be incensed that her idea had been “stolen.” How would you react? Instead, she appreciated Ann Patchet’s work and was delighted that the idea finally came to light. One does not have ownership over an idea, she notes. The idea has ownership over you.

This concept makes sense when waves of ideas come and they go. They aren’t always there but when they are, it’s always magical to see many ways the idea can manifest itself.

I’m having one of these moments in a new series of artwork I’m trying to produce. The concept has been with me for a while but I’ve just now gotten the chance to fully act on it. Her book gave me the impetus I needed with the suggestion that the idea will go elsewhere if not used. Now I’m fully immersed in it; albeit, while trying to manage my business(es), which is probably my other creative idea(s) that I’ve been nurturing for the last 8+ years.

She likens living in the moment while manifesting the idea as the most magical experience, full of pure joy, of which I can attest, when it happens:

“You may know this feeling. It’s the feeling you get when you’ve made [or done] something wonderful and when you look at it later, all you can say is, “I don’t even know where that came from.” You can’t repeat it. You can’t explain it. But it felt as if you were guided…It’s the most magnificent sensation imaginable when it arrives…[maybe] not a more perfect happiness to be found in life than this state, except perhaps falling in love.”

She calls this having a genius, as the Romans did, not as we do now “being” a genius. The difference keeps the creative person’s ego in check. This is contrary to those pinned with the label of genius (i.e. Harper Lee) or the self-absorbed artist, singer (e.g. Kanye West) or actress or lawyer, politician or any person for that matter who thinks they are, unique, one-of-a kind. They can be either too scared to create again having reached a pinnacle or too frighteningly egocentric when they do. We are all creators and living life fully is in the act of doing something. I call it “finding Balance.”

She describes the paradoxes involved. The moment the idea comes and you act on it is sacred and related to divine mystery, which I agree. I often explain coincidences that happen as more than just mere coincidences. However, she warns that although you must take the work involved seriously, you cannot think it too important or let it torment you or create such disruption that the work becomes a burden, then you lose the miraculous flow. The creative idea is then affected and becomes too heavy when it needs to remain light, not necessarily easy but enough so to bring joy. Life is about creating (the process) not necessarily the results of what you create. It’s great if the result is a masterpiece or a best seller, as her book Eat Pray Love was, but the intent cannot be just for this goal. There is too much pressure and a set up for self-destined failure, which may be why Harper Lee never wrote anything after To Kill a Mockingbird. Ann Patchet’s work is so highly regarded not only because she is a wonderful writer but mainly because of her similar philosophy, “I don’t write for an audience, I don’t think whether my book will sell, I don’t sell it before I finish writing it.

Gilbert states, “in the end, creativity is a gift to the creator, not the audience.” I would even say and creativity should be received gratefully, giving gratitude to the Creator. She says the creative work must be the most important thing to live artistically but not matter at all in order to live sanely. Again, finding that balance, while always being grateful and enjoying the good and bad of what you do. That’s a lesson I remember my father telling me, no matter what you do in life, make sure is something you enjoy doing.” This way you can overcome hardships that will happen along the way.

Gilbert’s book is all about the creative process. How the idea forms, how one chooses or doesn’t choose to act on the inspiration and how there is work involved when you choose to act, which she humorously calls the “shit sandwich.” I don’t have a problem with this language because it is aptly named when you understand the reasoning behind it. It refers to all the frustration involved and hardships to overcome in making the idea materialize. You’re either willing to eat the shit sandwich, that no one wants or chooses to eat, or not. How badly do you want to make your idea work? There are lessons in this book for everyone to follow. Persistence, not perfection, pays off. The shit sandwich is what happens in between the bright moments of the easy flow of inspiration. There are other lessons: trust in what you love, learn from fear, be open-minded and curious, say yes to inquisitiveness and interests because they are often clues pointing you to a path that you might not fully see, stop complaining, get doing.

I chose this book for my book group as a philosophy book not as a self-help. We enjoyed discussing during our Mardi Gras celebration — enjoying life in the doing — as described in my previous post.

This was just after the previous book we read last month called Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery, which is another one that I’d highly recommend. Sy Montgomery is a Naturalist who’s written a series of books that demonstrate Man’s symbiotic connection to Nature through the many experiences she has encountered. This one has to do with her observation and what we can learn from highly intelligent octopuses (not the more popular, but incorrect octopi). When reading her account, you learn how remarkable these mysterious and often feared creatures are but also how human emotions can become entangled and elevated with another type of being. As the book jacket states, her story “reveals what octopuses can teach us about the meeting of two very different minds.

Soul of an Octopus_Sy Montgomery_Art Is EverywhereThis is what I wrote to my book group about it. Hopefully, you’ll be able to see the connection between the two books and my delight in discovering them, coincidentally seeing how they relate to discovery and Art Is Everywhere:

I loved this book, btw and gave it a 10, which I rarely give, but it really spoke to me. I’ve been enamored with the sea and all its mysterious creatures, which is why I probably collect and paint seashells, sea life murals and have enjoyed a fresh and marine fish tank for over 20 years. Fish, surprisingly, also have personalities.

Sy Montgomery coincidentally mentions Cozumel as her first dive and likens it to something similar to visiting an alien planet right here on earth…It’s on my bucket list to go deep sea diving but until then, I’m going to go swimming with whale sharks (extra video ref). I learned about how this phenomenon came about through the Racing Extinction film (very worth watching even with some overtly political overtones). It aired in December but you may still be able to see it on the Discovery Channel?

Following suit on the philosophy take-away regarding this book about Karma and Consciousness,* I’m choosing Elizabeth Gilbert’s latest book Big Magic, Creative Living Beyond Fear. I believe it was written as a followup to her Ted Talk on Creativity that I was so impressed with that I  emailed the book group about way back. I just discovered she’s expanded it into book form. We’ve read Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat Pray Love and Committed before and discussed how she can have a somewhat self-absorbing nature to her writing but even though her stories are shared from personal experience, this broad topic on creativity and inspiration may grab our group of very creative ladies both collectively and individually.

I almost chose another book, Nonesense, the Power of Not Knowing by Jamie Holmes and will still recommend because I think it might be the perfect followup to Gilbert’s book. This one is filled with unknown facts behind veils of deception — from what you think you might know. Both books seem enlightening for living in the present.

Montgomery marries science with poetry in her descriptions of her dives along with her cultural knowledge in explaining the meaning of karma and consciousness.

The desire to change our ordinary, everyday consciousness does not seize everyone, but it’s a persistent them in human culture. Expanding the mind beyond self allows us to relive our loneliness, to connect to what Jung called universal consciousness…Plato called the animus mundi, the all-extensive world soul shared by all of life…Karma is interchanged with destiny…but the idea of karma has a deeper and more promising meaning than fate…Our karma is something over which, unlike fate, we do have control. “Volition is karma,” the Buddha is reported to have said. Karma, in Hindu and Buddhist traditions, is conscious action. Karma is not fate, but, in fact, its opposite. Karma is choice.”

In her chapter, Consciousness to think, to feel, to know, she describes the following reflection about the meaning of the Soul while attending a Tahitian church service, she “understands the power of worship, and the importance of contemplating mystery…in all our relationships, in all our deepest wonderings. We seek to fathom the soul…[The Soul] gives life meaning and purpose. The Soul is the fingerprint of God. Others say that soul is our innermost being, the thing that gives us our senses, our intelligence, our emotions, our desires, our will, our personalities, our identity. Perhaps none of this is true, [but as she sits in the pew she ponders,] I am certain of one thing…if I have a soul — and I think I do — an octopus has a soul too.

Strangely enough, she contemplates this idea (which I think has to do with connection and creativity as it takes on its own life as the title of her book) while she is transported by the pastor’s sermon to the “Gilbert Islands, where the octopus god, Na Kitka, was said to be the son of the first beings, and with his eight strong arms, shoved the islands up from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean…Immersed in mystery, my natural response, even on an expedition in the name of science, is to pray.”

Perhaps I’m more reflective with my birthday a day away, but not thinking there is really a connection to this, except that these two books brought great inspiration, in a timely and interconnected way that is beautifully mysterious. I am grateful to have read them and I can only hope their inspiration will be sustained, at least for a while.

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The Completion of a Life Size Bird Mural Starts the New Year

What a perfect way to start the new year with the completion of the life size bird mural, So Simple, a Beginning.

It was about a year ago that I first wrote about Jane Kim of InkDwell‘s endeavor to depict the evolution of the world’s birds in a giant 70 x 40 foot mural for Cornell University’s Department of Ornithology. It’s taken a year and that’s pretty miraculous considering the intricate detail and accuracy involved to paint 270 birds and even a few dinosaurs.

Here are InkDwell‘s photos below showing the stunning result. Casart wallcoverings were used in the early stage as temporary wallpaper templates for the continents and geographical locations on top of which the birds were painted.

1_Many birds painted by Jane Kim on Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog

Many birds painted by Jane Kim

African Section of mural on Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog

African Section of mural

Cassowary bird painted by Jane Kim on Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog

Cassowary Bird

Jane adding details Secretary Bird_casartblog

Secretary Bird

early stage of bird mural_casartblog

Early Stages

Cormorant in progress_casartblog

Cormorant in progress

Great grey owl_casartblog

Great Grey Owl

Detail Broadbill bird_casartblog

Detail Broadbill Bird

Great Hornbill_casarblog

Great Hornbill

Congratulations to Jane and her crew for all their hard work to create the largest and first-of-its-kind educational mural about the evolution of birds!!

Casart coverings is glad to have played even a small part in this major endeavor.

Next time you’re in New York, be sure to visit the Cornell University’s Lab of Ornithology to see the mural in person and perhaps even do a little bird watching while there.

Racing Extinction

After watching the film Racing Extinction, I thought it deserving of a blog post, because not only is it well done,* I like animals and  I’ve posted about efforts to save sharks and others before but it uses art to get its point across. In writing this post, I realized there have been a series of coincidental confluent events taking place in the process.

manta ray digital obscura projection on Art Is Everywhere

Majestic Manta Rays are just some of the animals featured and with a positive outcome.

At the time of this writing, the film has had over 11.5 million viewers, and just the other day, the video sound collaborators projected inspirational images of near extinct animals on the outside of the Vatican. Confluence #1: I just posted about the Pope and a mural created in his honor in my last post.

Racing Extinction on Art Is EverywhereOK, the location and animation in itself is pretty amazing. Just watch. Note: it requires patience for it starts after 10 minutes of silence with a lot of pauses and shots of the audience at night with only camera phones visible. It’s a meditative piece that is different than the Racing Extinction film but serves a similar purpose. There is no commentary only images and sounds of the animals with beautiful transitions. This gives a lot of time for reflection, which is the objective after all.

You’ll be amazed at how many animals are on the extinction list. Most all of the butterflies that I have painted + my clown fish in my fish tank (precisely because they are in people’s fish tanks and coral reef depletion). These are just to name a few that will hit home.

butterfly digital obscura 1 on Art Is Everywherebutterfly digital obscura 2 on Art Is Everywherebutterfly digital obscura 3 on Art Is Everywhereclown fish digital obscura projection on Art Is EverywhereI had already sent the film information to my husband, who happens to be attending the Climate Change Conference (COP 21) in Paris, thinking he might see the Racing Extinction folks in attendance. No report yet but coincidentally and yet probably strategically planned to market the film a the time of this climate change conference. Confluence #2. Instead, I received a beautiful picture of Paris, “the city of [Christmas / holiday] lights.”

Side note: I enjoyed watching the U2 Live concert the same night they just played in Paris. I always wanted to see them play live and I felt like I was there. There were a lot of moving moments and it was incredible how immediate the news was about it, with thoughts of Paris and San Bernadino and terrorism on everyone’s minds.

Paris Lights on Art Is EverywhereBesides man over fishing and killing animals, the film claims that the extinction of some animals is due to climate change. *Here’s where my politics differ to some degree but this is not a political blog so I won’t belabor points here because it’s been a roundabout argument from both sides of the subject. I’ll just say that I agree that some sensible steps to reduce carbon and methane emissions should be carefully considered and where adversely and economically impacted, there has to be a mutual meeting ground in order to get results. I do not believe man is completely in control of the world’s climate — that would be a tall and bold and almost arrogant “projection” to make when the world’s natural climate is changing all the time and there are larger forces than just man alone contributing. Nonetheless, the Racing Extinction group has a petition started on their website, if you’d like to join.

Confluence #3. I had mentioned I had written about efforts helping animal extinction before. This is the film’s main focus. OK, man is one of those animals but primarily it is about other animals with whom we share the planet. The manta ray and rare birds are among some. Confluence #4 will be in a separate post documenting the history of the world’s birds in a mural just completed and about which I just received the story alert at the time of this writing.

Regarding the Oceanic Preservation Society’s film production team: One of the photographers, Joel Sartore, creator of the Photo Arc [I’d like to feature in a single blog post, it is so impressive] and in fact the director, Louie Psihoyos, all work and have worked for the National Geographic, a publication I have been a long time supporter of and even took over my father’s subscription from 1921. I’m still wondering what to do with all the magazines because I’m running out of space, but I renew each year. The visuals and stories are worth reading and I like to support its efforts as well as its photographers, like Stephen Alvarez, about whom I’ve written before. Confluence #5.

Finally, this large-scale film projection is created and “performed” by Obscura Digital, behind the creative force of Travis Threlkel its founder and projection mapping. It is another group about which I’ve featured in a blog post (Confluence #6). Their creative concept is to use not only the Vatican but other buildings while traveling around in a Tesla and projecting on surfaces as moving graffiti if you will is both clever, ambitious and innovative. I’m in awe of the entire production from conception to execution to strategically creating the necessary buzz to spread the word, that there is one thing everyone can do. This in itself, may be an initial start to seeing results. I’ve already started…

Down by the Sea

While vacationing in the OBX what better way to celebrate life than posting about a recent discovery about Google’s Ocean Project and in the process finding this Men at Work song that I hadn’t heard before — jazzy and reflective of the beach’s beauty and beyond.

Down by the sea
I found your hidden treasure
Just you and me,
We overdosed on pleasure…

Imagine searching for directions to somewhere on Google Maps and looking at the street view so you’ll know what your destination will look like in real-time as you drive to it. Google’s Ocean Project gives you this street view in the ocean — under the water. They are mapping the world’s oceans and I can’t think of anything more other-worldly, right here on earth and without having to travel far to find. Truly fascinating!

When you go to the site, click on any map marker in the bottom left and it will take you to a 3-D panoramic view of that underwater spot. You can click on any thumbnail picture view and go there as well.

Google Ocean project_2 on Art Is Everywhere

Google Ocean project_1 on Art Is Everywhere

Have fun searching and discovering a whole other word that most of us will rarely see in person. Here’s a magical spot in the Florida Keys, where I hope to visit someday in person.

Florida Keys_Google Project_Art Is EverywhereIn the meantime, I’m enjoying this Australian sea-side video set to Down By the Sea and the ocean at Ocracokein real-time. Just hope not to see any sharks this trip.

…Down by the sea
I found your hidden treasure
Just you and me
We over-dosed on pleasure

Listen to your heart
Screamin’ at the sky
Can’t you feel it tremble?
Don’t you wonder why?

Global Weather Art

What’s one of the first things the news broadcasts on a continual basis? And what do you want to know — besides traffic? What info can help you for what to wear, what to pack, and what to prepare? Weather!

NOAA, the National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, has created a new global weather view map that is interactive. It’s not only fun and informative but beautiful and art in motion. Look at these views and check out the real-time animation for yourself.

NOAA_interactive global weather map via NOAA Environmental Visualization on Art Is Everywhere

NOAA_interactive global weather map via NOAA Environmental Visualization

Don’t forget to move the earth with your cursor to see other countries.

Who knew pressure could be so pretty!

NOAA_global weather winds on Art Is Everywhere

NOAA_global weather winds

NOAA_gloabal weather precipitation on Art Is Everywhere

NOAA_gloabal weather precipitation

NOAA_global weather moisture on Art Is Everywhere

NOAA_global weather moisture

NOAA_global weather Temperature on Art Is Everywhere

NOAA_global weather Temperature

 I’m hoping the weather this week during vacation in Ocracoke, NC will make some memorable artwork on this global view map or at least be.

Test Your Color Vision

How you see art, may be related to your color acuity.

Test your color vision with this simple iGame Eye test and see if you see more colors than a cat or better than a bat. Remember bats live in the dark so do not need to see a lot of color. Cats on the other hand have better vision than dogs. Does this relate to intellect? Hmmmm, I wonder. Read here about the evolution of color vision, and learn which animals see in color and which don’t. It might surprise you to know that invertebrates do see color but most mammals have a limited range of color.

iGame eye test 1 on Art is everyhwereiGame eye test 2 on Art is everyhwere

Full disclosure, the first time I did the test I got a 19 and color vision of a cat. The more you take the test, the better at it you will be. Also, memorization won’t help you because the color grids chage each time you take the test. A smart color test!

iGame eye test 3 on Art is everyhwere

iGame eye test 4 on Art is everyhwereMeanwhile there’s an artistic bent in the test itself, the more colors you see, the more creative you may be. Find out!

Here’s another Color Hue Challenge that’s not as easy as it looks. Farnsworth-Munsell test was first created by Dean Farnsworth in the 1940’s but Pantone (the “color experts”) provides this free one online, for their X-Right Computer Screen color calibrator product, that I’ve used before for print color management.

Pantone color hue challenge 1 on Art is Everywhere Pantone color hue challenge 2 on Art is Everywhere Pantone color hue challenge 3 on Art is Everywhere Pantone color hue challenge 4 on Art is EverywhereGoogle is researching the links between color, creativity and productivity (via a New Orleans study effort).

Creative Thinking Hub’s article on Thinking more Creatively by Using Color is pretty interesting. No wonder blue remains my favorite color, but I love it more in combinations with other colors.

Wintry Mix

This is a wintry mix post that is pretty —

(not filled with all the snow & slush of recent snow storms).

Every year China puts on an elaborate and spectacular ice-sculpture festival at the Ice and Snow World in the Harbin Hellongjiang province. Here’s a recent preview and from what I’ve posted previously.

China_ice sculptures_AIEView many more pics here.

Ice Sculpture via CNN_AIEAnother out of the ordinary wintry scene is Greg Dunn’s photo that looks like winter trees with their icy roots exposed. However, it’s his painting of “Cortical Columns” using neuroscience to create such imagery.

Greg Dunn Cortical Columns painting on Art Is EverywhereMy father would be pleased to see neuroscience and art combined in such a beautiful depiction.

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