Summer Schedule

Hello readers, with the summer schedule and needing to put forth extra energy and effort to my main CasartCoverings.com website and migrating the Slipcovers for your walls blog to an updated version, the posts on this blog will move to a temporary and limited, twice-a-month schedule.

Thank you for your continued interest as art oriented observations will still be posted, just not as frequently, like this little video-ditty about the singer Miquel’s creative process, on NPR’s Noteworthy series.

NPR_creative process film_AIE

I’ve listened to but not all that familiar with Miguel’s music and only like some of it, particularly the rhythm and blues, funk and more psychedelic-soul / lounge oriented pieces, but his thought process regarding creating music and how the artist is affected is surprisingly very thoughtful. I enjoyed learning more about him and his music as he discusses the inspiration for his latest music and video. He states the importance of being in the moment to absorb those bits of creative sparks that are so quickly fleeting. He recalls his time on the beach in letting those moments flow. I’ll be thinking of this as vacation to the beach is quickly coming and I don’t want to bring too much work this time. Click the image below to view.

Personally, I like his custom wallpaper šŸ˜‰

Miguel wallpaper_AIE

Go ahead and subscribe (sidebar link) to this blog so you won’t miss out and won’t have to remember to check back. This way the posts will come to your inbox.

Hope you enjoy the rest of the summer and finding art is everywhere.

Two Art Movies

I just came across two art documentaries that could be very interesting. The first one is called Versions by Oliver Laric and the other is a followup to Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, entitled, The Fake Case by Andreas Johnsen.

Versions is actually a part of the Black Box exhibit at the Hirshhorn Museum through October 5, which also has sculpture associated in the Sculpture Garden.

As Michael O’Sullivan describes in his Washington Post article, Illustrating imitation’s inventiveness, it explores what happens when an artist appropriates the imagery of another’s artwork. Artists use visual references all the time. This is interesting to me in that not only does it delve into the creative process but it questions the limits of intellectual property rights. One example that I had never noticed before was how Mogli’s stance and sequence of actions in The Jungle Book is a near exact replica of Christopher Robin in The Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, except Christopher is fully clothed.

Versions video by Oliver Laric_AIE

I personally don’t have a problem with the above illustration because it is the same studio using it’s own visual reference. I wouldn’t even have a problem with another artist using one of these illustrations as a visual reference for creating new artwork, as long as it wasn’t and exact copy and they weren’t trying to claim it as their own. From a technical standpoint, visual references help artist’s produce their work with efficiency.

The second art film, The Fake Case, deals with the subject of a recent blog post about Ai Weiwei, his artwork and about the time when he was held captive in his native Chinese homeland. This film follows up on the artist after his 81 day detention in prison and his time under ‘house arrest.’ The film takes its name from Weiwei’s company called Fake. It could be a sleeper or an interesting rental.

The Fake Case film on Art is EverywhereWe’ve been watching a lot of interesting documentaries lately, with our son Jackson’s guidance. He’s the film buff, so we’ll add this to the list but will probably watch after he returns home from his school semester this fall, since this film is out in theaters now. As I was writing this, he saw it was about Ai Weiwei and knew all about him and the first movie. He said that fortunately he has many helpers helping make his artwork for him in other places. Now, that should be another documentary.