Art in Fashionable Flowers

Unfortunately, this scheduled post never published when it was supposed to on March 19th. Good thing because it seems appropriate with Easter to post it now. I’ve changed some wording to put it in current context.

Spring is here! Already I hear birds chirping and see flowers popping up everywhere, in fashion that is.

Look at these gorgeous floral dresses and you can see a celebration of spring as well as beautiful artistic, flowery design.

Floral Dress_AIE blog

I love how this dress flows. It  reminds me of a Chagall

With the wild winter weather we’ve had, I wouldn’t be surprised if there might even be one more snowstorm [back in March]. However, this picture below shows the dichotomy in the window dressing, announcing spring with snow falling.

Window Dressing Dichotomy via Washinton Post on AIE blogI bet you’ll see more fashionable flowers in these flowery dresses more than ever in the market for this spring season.

Floral Dresses_AIE blog

I like the 2 tropical ones on the far right

And why not? Spring is the perfect time to celebrate the flower’s power of simple yet pretty petals, especially when they can form such kaleidoscope of color, as seen from above in this Dutch landscape of Keukenhof Gardens.

We actually visited these gardens in Holland. It just happened to be right before most of the flowers were blooming.Tulips_AIE blogBright, vibrant colors are not only prevalent in flowers but also in DC’s newest Marion Barry Mural. I think it’s a pretty good likeness and I like how it is portable, being painted on removable tiles that can be transported and installed in different locations.Marion Barry Mural on AIEGetting back to celebrating spring with flowers, there is a new DCGardens.com website that shows what are the latest blooming varieties in the DC area and where to find them.

It already highlights one of my favorite plant places, the National Arboretum.

It’s interesting for me to go back and read these previously written, related posts after so much time:

First Day of Spring

National Arboretum Posts

And this time, I know now how to post a video (and even center it).

Happy Spring & Happy Easter!

Giving it Up for the GSA…

…and other federal artistic watchdogs, like the “florist-in-chief.”

What does this mean? Well, firstly, there was a fascinating article in Washington Post that describes how the GSA (General Services Administration — a federal watchdog agency) is on a hunt to recover “lost” artwork from the Depression, which was created as part of the WPA (New Deal Works Progress Administration), to help artists have employment and document historical art. At the time, the government paid artists up to $42 a week. This was a large amount back then and a life preserver during our nation’s worst financial crisis. Over 20,000 works of art were created in response. The value of these pieces range from $3 – $250,000. The responsibility for their welfare was transferred to the GSA when the WPA program ended after WWII. The Fine Arts Programs manages over 19,000 pieces that are displayed in federal buildings across the country. Federal law requires that government owned artwork must be displayed in government buildings.

RecoveredPainting_GSA as seen on Art Is Everywhere

A recovered WPA painting by the GSA, courtesy Washington Post

Here’s another known example of a WPA mural in Gloucester, MA’s City Hall.

Charles Allan Winter's "City Council in Session.'' via Boston.com, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Charles Allan Winter's "City Council in Session.'' Courtesy Boston.com

Another federal worker, who has her eye on art — the art of flower arranging — is The White House’s new florist, Laura Dowling. She uses an abundance of vegetables and fruits to create unexpected, large and small scale arrangements with her gorgeous flowers.

Laura Dowling. Photo by Bill O'Leary, WP, as seen on Art Is Everywhere

Laura Dowling. Photo by Bill O'Leary, Washington Post

Laura Dowling apricot vase. Photo Marvin Joseph. As seen on Art Is Everywhere

Laura Dowling's apricot vases. Photo Marvin Joseph. Washington Post

If you’d like to see more impact with flowers in interior design, click on the Big Bang Design post that I wrote recently for Slipcovers for your walls, casartblog.